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Old 02-26-2011, 04:26 AM   #1
Dgonza9
 
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I'm considering adding a second element to my keggle. My keggle is already grounded to the skirt on the first element. Do I need a second ground when I install another element?

Thanks, guys.
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Old 02-26-2011, 04:40 AM   #2
TrevorRuggiero
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I use a keggle with two elements in it as well. For both my elements I connected the ground wire from the plug to the element enclosure and that worked well. If you already grounded your keg than you are all set.

If you are worried one way to check is to bust out the volt meter and see if you can measure a voltage potential between your keg and ground/element enclosure or between the two element grounds. If you start to see a voltage potential between your grounds than something is not right.

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Old 02-26-2011, 05:11 AM   #3
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No. One ground is plenty. Even if the elements are from different circuits.
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Old 02-26-2011, 07:53 AM   #4
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Thanks. Hey, Trevor, any downside to having two elements mounted in one keggle? I was considering 220V, but my electrical panel is full and it would require rewiring existing circuits to slimline breakers.
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Old 02-26-2011, 03:38 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dgonza9 View Post
Thanks. Hey, Trevor, any downside to having two elements mounted in one keggle? I was considering 220V, but my electrical panel is full and it would require rewiring existing circuits to slimline breakers.
I wanted to be able to use my brew rig while at school in Boston so I went away from the 220V and used 2 120V 2000W Elements instead. The upside is I can now use my brewery pretty much anywhere. The downside is I have to find two separate 20amp circuits to plug the elements into. I end up having extensions cords running all over the place. I also only have 4000W with both elements running so it takes me a little longer to heat the strike water than it would for someone with a 5500W element. It takes me about 1h to go from 40F to 168F, not sure how long its taking the 5500W guys. If you are staying in one place I would have the 220V put in, but if you want the flexibility 2 120V elements definitely works.

 
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Old 02-26-2011, 04:19 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrevorRuggiero

I wanted to be able to use my brew rig while at school in Boston so I went away from the 220V and used 2 120V 2000W Elements instead. The upside is I can now use my brewery pretty much anywhere. The downside is I have to find two separate 20amp circuits to plug the elements into. I end up having extensions cords running all over the place. I also only have 4000W with both elements running so it takes me a little longer to heat the strike water than it would for someone with a 5500W element. It takes me about 1h to go from 40F to 168F, not sure how long its taking the 5500W guys. If you are staying in one place I would have the 220V put in, but if you want the flexibility 2 120V elements definitely works.
I figure I can recirculate thru my Rims tube for extra power in heating strike water But everyone seems to suggest 220V. I'm trying to be practical. The trouble is really the hole in my keggle if I decide to go 220v later.

Thanks for the reply.
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Old 02-26-2011, 04:44 PM   #7
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It really depends on how your system is wired.
If you are running off two different 20 amp breakers, then the grounded element will always have to be plugged in to properly ground the kettle. If you happen to plug in the ungrounded element without plugging in the grounded element, you would be live and ungrounded. Personally, if you are powering the two different elements off two different 20 amp breakers, I would ground both elements.

 
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Old 02-26-2011, 04:49 PM   #8
TrevorRuggiero
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dgonza9 View Post
I figure I can recirculate thru my Rims tube for extra power in heating strike water But everyone seems to suggest 220V. I'm trying to be practical. The trouble is really the hole in my keggle if I decide to go 220v later.

Thanks for the reply.
I had a couple of these welded onto my keggle for the heaters http://www.mcmaster.com/#weld-on-tank-fittings/=b7arjq

That way I can change them out, or if I decide to go 220V I can just screw a plug into the port that I am not using. If you do get them welded on make sure you find a shop that has experience welding stainless steel.

-T

 
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Old 02-26-2011, 10:52 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevehaun View Post
It really depends on how your system is wired.
If you are running off two different 20 amp breakers, then the grounded element will always have to be plugged in to properly ground the kettle. If you happen to plug in the ungrounded element without plugging in the grounded element, you would be live and ungrounded. Personally, if you are powering the two different elements off two different 20 amp breakers, I would ground both elements.
That's a really good point. I think I'll ground them both.
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Old 02-27-2011, 12:16 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevehaun View Post
I would ground both elements.
Agreed...protect yourself from the unanticipated.

 
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