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Old 02-25-2011, 04:23 AM   #1
psuicers
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Default Too soon to move to secondary?

Quick question. I just made a wheat beer this past Saturday. By tuesday it was done fermenting and the gravity is down to where it should be? Is it to soon to move to a secondary this weekend and just let it sit in there since I'm planning of brewing another beer this weekend, or should I keep it in there for another week? Thanks for the help.
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Old 02-25-2011, 05:06 AM   #2
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It is always too soon to move to secondary. With a wheat beer, you aren't trying to clarify it, so I would say leave it be, invest in another fermenter, and brew more often .

I understand your logic of brewing, moving the fermented beer to a secondary, then having another in the primary, and cycling over again, but your beers will benefit from an extended primary with the exception of wheat beers, they are meant to be drank young.

So for your hefe, two weeks primary, then rack to bottles or keg, carb for 2-3 weeks, and enjoy.

IMO, secondary is for clarifying, dry-hopping (which I do in the primary too), and fruit beers (whic require a tertiary [3rd] clearing vessel). Anyhow, do a search here for extended primaary fermentation, you'll find some interesting threads, and the consensus is, better beer.

Welcome to our obsession.

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Old 02-25-2011, 05:40 AM   #3
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Leave it for a total of 3 weeks and ferment your next brew in the open fermentor.
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Old 02-25-2011, 06:21 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schnitzengiggle
It is always too soon to move to secondary. With a wheat beer, you aren't trying to clarify it, so I would say leave it be, invest in another fermenter, and brew more often .

I understand your logic of brewing, moving the fermented beer to a secondary, then having another in the primary, and cycling over again, but your beers will benefit from an extended primary with the exception of wheat beers, they are meant to be drank young.

So for your hefe, two weeks primary, then rack to bottles or keg, carb for 2-3 weeks, and enjoy.

IMO, secondary is for clarifying, dry-hopping (which I do in the primary too), and fruit beers (whic require a tertiary [3rd] clearing vessel). Anyhow, do a search here for extended primaary fermentation, you'll find some interesting threads, and the consensus is, better beer.

Welcome to our obsession.

Cheers!
Thanks for the info. It actually is gonna be a cherry wheat. So I'll just wait another week and move to secondary and add the cherry flavoring. Thanks again. But your right. It definitely is madness.
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Old 02-25-2011, 08:40 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psuicers View Post
Thanks for the info. It actually is gonna be a cherry wheat. So I'll just wait another week and move to secondary and add the cherry flavoring. Thanks again. But your right. It definitely is madness.
If you're just using cherry flavoring/extract, you can just add it into the primary/bottling bucket with the priming sugar. You would only need to let it sit with actual fruit in order to let the beer absorb the flavors from them, and to let the yeast ferment the sugars in the fruit. Heck, if you're able to measure it well enough, you could add the flavoring to the glass when you're able to drink it and it wouldn't make a difference.
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