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Old 12-09-2011, 06:05 PM   #21
GordonT
 
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Nov 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowBird View Post
I am fairly new to brewing, 5 extract batches in and I am ready to switch to all grain. My favorite beer is Triple Karmilite so I am going to use your recipe as my first all grain this weekend. I was just curious if you had any advice or anything you may have changed since you posted the recipe? Also how is the color? I have done an extract "white ale" that came out dark brown and I was shooting for a golden color. I was told this is because of the malt extract. So I guess my question is does this beer have the same color as Triple Karmilite? Color is not everything but I really want to fine tune my brewing to be able to get the colors I am shooting for. Thanks for any advice you have and for posting the recipe.
The color is very close. A nice golden Belgian ale. My grain bill does not include any dark malts so your beer should turn out well. Not white but a nice golden color.

I am going to rebrew this shortly. After a tasting of the original last night the only thing I will experiment with is the amount of spice in the finish. Karmeliete definitely has a very floral coriander flavour.

Actually there is one other thing I am going to change next time around. I got a great tip of sugar and how to best use it to ensure a low FG. Don't add the sugar/syrup during the boil. Wait until the head begins to drop a bit during primary and then add. Reasoning on this is that yeast eats the easy to digest sugars first and complex sugar later. Forcing it to eat the complex sugars during the first part of primary will ensure your FG is lower, making the beer more 'digestible'

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Old 12-09-2011, 06:20 PM   #22
GordonT
 
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Originally Posted by Akavango View Post
By the way can you tell me a little more about the fermentation?
How long in the primary vessel? What temp?
Did you transfer to a secondary vessel?
Do you bottle it or keg it?
Thanks
Primary was over in 4 days but I left it on the yeast for a week. It cleared in secondary in just a few days but I left it for another week. I have just started bottling a bit of every batch I brew, just to taste the difference and so I can give some to friends. I have always kegged this particular brew.

I have been experimenting with higher temperatures but in future will keep to a more moderate range. I believe the best fermentation temperature is to start cool (mid 60s) and gradually let it rise to low to mid 70s. In past I have allowed this beer to get to high 70s but I don't think that is necessary to get the flavour profile we're after.

 
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Old 12-30-2011, 06:58 AM   #23
SnowBird
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Dec 2011
New Orleans, La
Posts: 39

Quote:
Originally Posted by GordonT View Post
The color is very close. A nice golden Belgian ale. My grain bill does not include any dark malts so your beer should turn out well. Not white but a nice golden color.

I am going to rebrew this shortly. After a tasting of the original last night the only thing I will experiment with is the amount of spice in the finish. Karmeliete definitely has a very floral coriander flavour.

Actually there is one other thing I am going to change next time around. I got a great tip of sugar and how to best use it to ensure a low FG. Don't add the sugar/syrup during the boil. Wait until the head begins to drop a bit during primary and then add. Reasoning on this is that yeast eats the easy to digest sugars first and complex sugar later. Forcing it to eat the complex sugars during the first part of primary will ensure your FG is lower, making the beer more 'digestible'
Hey GordonT,
Thanks again for the great post and recipe, I am very excited. It was my first all grain and my OG was 1.077 so I think it started out ok. My question is about the fermentation. It has been in the primary for 10 days now and the their is still a very healthy (not so active) layer of kraesen (however it is spelled) on top. I didnt move it to the secondary because I normally don't have this much ontop for this long. It normally subsides and pushes back to the walls and i guess down to the trub. Is this something you normally see? And is this a difference with all grain brewing vs extract as well? I know patience is key with brewing and I am leaving it be I just want to make sure it is normal. I was hoping to be watching it in the glass carbon now. : ). Thanks again.

 
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Old 12-30-2011, 07:02 AM   #24
Akavango
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Aug 2011
Cork, Cork
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You can safely leave it in the primary until bottling. When i did that recipe it was ready to bottle in 3 weeks.

I'll be doing it again in the next 2 weeks.
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Old 12-30-2011, 10:42 PM   #25
SnowBird
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Dec 2011
New Orleans, La
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akavango View Post
You can safely leave it in the primary until bottling. When i did that recipe it was ready to bottle in 3 weeks.

I'll be doing it again in the next 2 weeks.
Yes, thank you for the response. I have been reading these posts for sometime about secondary vs extended primary. I understand everyone says you can just leave it in the primary but if I want to move it to the secondary can I do so before the kraesen levels back out into the wort. Or do I have to wait?

 
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Old 12-31-2011, 09:55 AM   #26
Akavango
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Aug 2011
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I'm not expert but I would leave it in the primary till the krausen is gone.
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Old 12-31-2011, 06:00 PM   #27
SnowBird
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Dec 2011
New Orleans, La
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Thanks Akavango! Is that Cork Ireland you are from? My great grandfather was born there.

 
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Old 12-31-2011, 11:28 PM   #28
GordonT
 
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Nov 2010
Victoria, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowBird View Post
Hey GordonT,
Thanks again for the great post and recipe, I am very excited. It was my first all grain and my OG was 1.077 so I think it started out ok. My question is about the fermentation. It has been in the primary for 10 days now and the their is still a very healthy (not so active) layer of kraesen (however it is spelled) on top. I didnt move it to the secondary because I normally don't have this much ontop for this long. It normally subsides and pushes back to the walls and i guess down to the trub. Is this something you normally see? And is this a difference with all grain brewing vs extract as well? I know patience is key with brewing and I am leaving it be I just want to make sure it is normal. I was hoping to be watching it in the glass carbon now. : ). Thanks again.
Krausen For a beer of this strength it is a good idea to either do a yeast starter or to use yeast from a previous ferment. Throwing a single yeast package in may not give you enough yeast to have a vigorous ferment that ends in the usual 3 - 5 days. Some people throw in 2 packages but that is expensive. I've taken to either making a starter or doing my first brew in the 1050 - 1055 range and putting the next stronger beer onto that nicely plentiful yeast. Good luck

 
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Old 01-01-2012, 11:51 AM   #29
Akavango
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Aug 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowBird
Thanks Akavango! Is that Cork Ireland you are from? My great grandfather was born there.
I'm Belgian expat living in Cork. Good luck with you beer.
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Old 01-05-2012, 08:51 PM   #30
Androclese
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Jan 2012
oswego, Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GordonT View Post
Actually there is one other thing I am going to change next time around. I got a great tip of sugar and how to best use it to ensure a low FG. Don't add the sugar/syrup during the boil. Wait until the head begins to drop a bit during primary and then add. Reasoning on this is that yeast eats the easy to digest sugars first and complex sugar later. Forcing it to eat the complex sugars during the first part of primary will ensure your FG is lower, making the beer more 'digestible'
Hi!

I am going to give this one a shot on Saturday, but I had a question regarding the sugar. You state that you "wait until the head begins to drop a bit during primary and then add."

I have a few questions about that....

I am using plastic for my primary so I cannot see inside the bucket very well. Any guestimates on time/intensity of bubbling, etc,. i should be looking for before adding the sugar to the primary?

Did you warm the syrup or just put it in at room temp? Did you stir it in or just dump and seal?

Thanks!

 
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