Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Better and better
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-13-2011, 06:11 PM   #1
davebrew66
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Buffalo, New York
Posts: 30
Default Better and better

Brewed only two batches so far. Starting with kits until I get my feet wet.

1st Coopers IPA. Not a real IPA, not hoppy enough. Better and better as it bottle conditions.

2nd Brewers Best American Light. Brewed for the wife to keep her happy, although she does like the Coopers. 1st week in the bottle, no carb but OK. 2nd week it tasted like toadstools. Waited til week 4 in the bottle, YUM!

Can't wait to start AG batches. They must be awesome!


davebrew66 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2011, 06:52 PM   #2
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Solway, MN
Posts: 8,033
Liked 1093 Times on 906 Posts
Likes Given: 562

Default

Quote:
Can't wait to start AG batches. They must be awesome!
Not necessarily. All grain gives you much more control over the process and more choices for blending the grains for your taste but you also have waaaaay more chances to screw up a batch. If you like the idea of control, if you want to spend the time learning the process and the time it takes to do the mashing, all grain is fun but it won't necessarily always give you better beer.

Two things that can make better beer are temperature control during the fermentation and taking time to let the ferment complete before bottling or kegging.

Most ales will ferment over a range of temperatures. However, they will throw off more undesirable (most times) flavors if they are fermented too warm. I've brewed at 72 degrees ambient and at 62 degrees ambient and guess what tastes better. The fermentation process gives off heat too and even if your room is at 72, your beer might be 75 to 80 degrees in the bucket.

Many kits tell you to ferment for a week and then bottle. Want better beer? Be patient and let the yeast have more time to clean up the undesirable flavors. I've been giving mine 3 weeks and I probably should wait for 4 but the beer tastes better and takes less time to "bottle condition".


RM-MN is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2011, 07:02 PM   #3
rjwhite41
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Osceola, Iowa
Posts: 1,419
Liked 25 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

[QUOTE=RM-MN;2642422]Most ales will ferment over a range of temperatures. However, they will throw off more undesirable (most times) flavors if they are fermented too warm. I've brewed at 72 degrees ambient and at 62 degrees ambient and guess what tastes better.QUOTE]

That's really just a blanket statement. It really depends on what you want out of your yeast. Sometimes I ferment high and sometimes I ferment low. It all depends on how well I know the yeast and what flavor profile I am going for.
rjwhite41 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2011, 12:36 PM   #4
davebrew66
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Buffalo, New York
Posts: 30
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RM-MN View Post
Not necessarily. All grain gives you much more control over the process and more choices for blending the grains for your taste but you also have waaaaay more chances to screw up a batch. If you like the idea of control, if you want to spend the time learning the process and the time it takes to do the mashing, all grain is fun but it won't necessarily always give you better beer.

Two things that can make better beer are temperature control during the fermentation and taking time to let the ferment complete before bottling or kegging.

Most ales will ferment over a range of temperatures. However, they will throw off more undesirable (most times) flavors if they are fermented too warm. I've brewed at 72 degrees ambient and at 62 degrees ambient and guess what tastes better. The fermentation process gives off heat too and even if your room is at 72, your beer might be 75 to 80 degrees in the bucket.

Many kits tell you to ferment for a week and then bottle. Want better beer? Be patient and let the yeast have more time to clean up the undesirable flavors. I've been giving mine 3 weeks and I probably should wait for 4 but the beer tastes better and takes less time to "bottle condition".
I let the BB kit ferment for two weeks, unlike the Coopers that sat for only a week. The Coopers tastes amazing now after bottle conditioning for 2 months and the BB kit tastes pretty darn good after being in the bottle for 4 weeks. I am interested to see how much faster the BB kit conditions with the extra week in the fermenter.

That all being said, 100 bottles of homebrew doesn't go very far, and I really need to start brewing another batch to keep the pipeline going!!
davebrew66 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2011, 01:08 PM   #5
Valcarde
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Ontario
Posts: 159
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by davebrew66 View Post
I let the BB kit ferment for two weeks, unlike the Coopers that sat for only a week. The Coopers tastes amazing now after bottle conditioning for 2 months and the BB kit tastes pretty darn good after being in the bottle for 4 weeks. I am interested to see how much faster the BB kit conditions with the extra week in the fermenter.

That all being said, 100 bottles of homebrew doesn't go very far, and I really need to start brewing another batch to keep the pipeline going!!
Buy yourself another fermenter. Try to keep one thing brewing at all times. It will help greatly with setting up a pipeline!
__________________
Currently Brewing:
Carboy 1: Maple Wheat Ale
Carboy 2: Munton's Export Stout, modified
Carboy 3: Choco-Caramel Amber Ale
Valcarde is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2011, 03:25 PM   #6
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Solway, MN
Posts: 8,033
Liked 1093 Times on 906 Posts
Likes Given: 562

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Valcarde View Post
Buy yourself another fermenter. Try to keep one thing brewing at all times. It will help greatly with setting up a pipeline!
Good idea to have another fermenter. I'm the only one that drinks in this house and I don't drink much but I have 2 fermenters going now and I have had 3 at once so I have a variety of different beers to drink and I can let some of it sit to age longer without feeling pressured to drink it too young. To keep from being overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of beer that that could produce, I brew half size batches now.


RM-MN is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools



Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS