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Old 02-10-2011, 09:42 PM   #1
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Default Is there such a thing as too long a diacetyl rest?

Working on a lager. Sat in primary for two weeks. Brought it up to 64 degrees for a D rest. Work/life schedule got hectic. Been sitting at 64 degrees for about 8 days now. It's going into a secondary for lagering this evening.

Any ill effects from this? I searched the forums and found people do a D rest for 2-7 days (most recommend 72 hours). I haven't read anything bad about keeping it at a D rest for too long. But no one has clearly explained what would happen if it rests for too long, or rather, keeping the beer at a warmer than ideal fermenting temperature for an extended period of time.

And I haven't tasted it or taken an SG since bumping it to D rest. Smells good through the airlock. We'll find out tonight.


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Old 02-10-2011, 09:49 PM   #2
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I've never gone longer than 5 days with no ill effects so I can't say what 8 days might do. Keep us posted... Cheers!!!!


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Old 02-16-2011, 03:56 PM   #3
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So how did it turn out? I have a lager that I'm putting into diacetyl rest this weekend and planning on brewing an IPA on my day off on monday. I have one fermentation chamber that can heat or cool, but need the heat to bring the IPA to 70. So I was debating on letting the lager rest for about a week till the weather around here warms up a bit more. Or until the IPA is done then put the lager in the fermentation chamber to slowly chill.

So I'm very interested to see how this worked for you
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Old 02-19-2011, 07:53 PM   #4
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Unfortunately, do to some serious life problems that are not relevant to the beer or this thread, this lager is still setting in d rest.

So I brewed this on 1/16/11. Brought to d rest on 1/31/11. Now it's 2/19/11. I'm half tempted to just bottle it and try again. 15 days at 58 degrees. 19 days at 64 degrees? Could be an okay ale at this point. Or should I let it sit another week or two at current temp and then bottle?

Anyone have 2 cents to spare? It's clearly not a lost beer. Just don't know if it's still worth going through the lagering process and time to get a so-so lager or cut my ties and get a so-so ale.
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Old 02-19-2011, 08:33 PM   #5
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Go ahead and lager it. You've just done some conditioning on the front end. It should be fine.
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Old 02-20-2011, 12:31 AM   #6
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I'd just go ahead and lager it. I doubt if it will have any effect on the beer at all.
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Old 02-21-2011, 05:57 AM   #7
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I went ahead and tossed it in secondary this evening. SG was at 1.010. Haven't seen any bubbles come out of the airlock, but I can see some minimal movement in the carboy. Smelled pretty good. Oddly enough, I didn't think to taste it. I was kind of surprised at how clear it already was. We'll see how it comes out.

And it freed up a primary so I got to brew another batch tonight. It's nice when you finally have some time to brew.
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Old 02-21-2011, 06:35 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilentAutumn View Post
Oddly enough, I didn't think to taste it. I was kind of surprised at how clear it already was. We'll see how it comes out.
Doesn't surprise me: before I dryhopped my last IPA, it was as crystal clear as you could get. Lagering doesn't add to clarity as much as making flavors crisper IMO. Since the D rest is about finishing up the fermentation at a warmer temp, I don't think there's too many problems at keeping it there for a longer time. As long as you're equally lazy about the lagering time at least
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Old 02-21-2011, 06:57 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davesrose View Post
As long as you're equally lazy about the lagering time at least
If laziness was a sport, I would be professional with multiple championships. But I'm in no hurry with this beer. I'm hoping it'll be ready by late May or early June.
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Old 02-24-2011, 12:54 AM   #10
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I have a follow-up question on this beer if anyone can help.

Since it was kept at d rest for so long and basically fermented out to FG, is there any reason to take a step down approach with temperature or can I just put t in the fridge at 34 degrees right away?

My understanding is that you ferment the beer to about 80% completion, bring to d rest, then start dropping the temp gradually from d rest. This is done so that the yeast will remain active, not go dormant or get shocked from large of a temperature shift, and be able to complete fermentation.

Well, since I'm at FG (and current temp is 50 degrees) and fermentation is complete, can I just skip to 34 degrees? Or is the step down still necessary since the yeast may not be actively fermenting, but consuming byproducts that would otherwise produce off flavors?


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