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Old 02-09-2011, 09:06 PM   #1
gnoonan
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Default CloneBrews Recipe flaw?

Hi Folks!
I have the rodenbach grand cru in secondary right now, I used the clonebrews book for the step by step. I noticed something in the recipe that bothers me, and here it is:
There is NO aging specified in the recipe, but the yeast pitched is wyeasts lambic blend. It says 7 days in primary, and 7 days on oak chips in secondary. Won't this quick turnaround produce a chance of bottle bombs if the wild yeast haven't had time to do their work? Also, I seriously doubt that the bugs have had a chance to sour anything (produce the tart taste of the grand cru) in that short of time.
Any thoughts or suggestions from you brewing gods?


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Old 02-09-2011, 09:25 PM   #2
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Something like Grand Cru takes no less than 12-18 months. Some argue that it takes 3 years (with blending) to make an outstanding lambic.


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Old 02-09-2011, 10:59 PM   #3
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My copy says to secondary until fermentation complete. No time line.
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Old 02-09-2011, 11:28 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by electric_beer View Post
Something like Grand Cru takes no less than 12-18 months. Some argue that it takes 3 years (with blending) to make an outstanding lambic.
Rodenbach Grand Cru is a Flanders Red, not a lambic. Same timeline, though.

The regular Rodenbach is younger (1 year aged) and not nearly as sour.

The Grand Cru is a blend of the young version and the 3-year aged version--I think it's about 1/3 young, 2/3 old, I'll double-check tonight.
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Old 02-09-2011, 11:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
My copy says to secondary until fermentation complete. No time line.
Funny thing is that they all say, except the Lindimans frambosien which say to age for 6 months. I was just a little confused that's all. To be quite honest, this is my first wild ale so I had no idea what I was getting into timewise. Looks like its time to buy some more buckets!
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Old 02-10-2011, 01:40 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SumnerH View Post
Rodenbach Grand Cru is a Flanders Red, not a lambic. Same timeline, though.

The regular Rodenbach is younger (1 year aged) and not nearly as sour.

The Grand Cru is a blend of the young version and the 3-year aged version--I think it's about 1/3 young, 2/3 old, I'll double-check tonight.
I believe you've got that backwards, sort of. The Grand Cru is just straight old beer, ~20 months. The Classic is a blend of the same old beer (30%) and a longer lower gravity ale (70%) that provides some sweetness.

I've heard nothing but bad things about the clone brews books (pear extract in Duvel etc...). Pick up a copy of Wild Brews if you want to brew more sours.

here is a great write up of Rodenbach's actual methods: http://brewery.org/library/Rodnbch.html
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Old 02-10-2011, 03:17 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock View Post
I believe you've got that backwards, sort of. The Grand Cru is just straight old beer, ~20 months. The Classic is a blend of the same old beer (30%) and a longer lower gravity ale (70%) that provides some sweetness.

I've heard nothing but bad things about the clone brews books (pear extract in Duvel etc...). Pick up a copy of Wild Brews if you want to brew more sours.

here is a great write up of Rodenbach's actual methods: http://brewery.org/library/Rodnbch.html
Yep, you're right. Wild Brews also says that the proportion of old beer in the Classic has been lowered to 25% in recent years.
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Old 02-10-2011, 03:27 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock
I've heard nothing but bad things about the clone brews books (pear extract in Duvel etc...). Pick up a copy of Wild Brews if you want to brew more sours.
I want to second this. I received Clone Brews for Christmas and promptly returned it after looking through the recipes. Orval had no mention of Brett B, among other interesting omissions. I bought Wild Brews instead.
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Old 02-10-2011, 11:25 PM   #9
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Well its settled, no more clone brew. Thanks for all of your advice, and I'll let you know how the pgrand cru turned out in another year or so.
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Old 02-11-2011, 02:58 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock View Post
I believe you've got that backwards, sort of. The Grand Cru is just straight old beer, ~20 months. The Classic is a blend of the same old beer (30%) and a longer lower gravity ale (70%) that provides some sweetness.
actually the grand cru is now a blend of old and young beer, it says on the bottle its 67% old beer(yrs) and 33% new beer, for a while they didnt have any labeling saying this but you could definitely tell the difference in flavor


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