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Old 02-02-2011, 05:54 PM   #1
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I found a heating element that's 4000W / 230V / 50HZ

Can a 50HZ element be used? Will it change anything like the Amps drawn?



 
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Old 02-02-2011, 07:02 PM   #2
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Can't be used AFAIK, in the US our power is 60Hz. If I'm wrong about this someone please chime in.


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Old 02-02-2011, 07:46 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by wyzazz View Post
If I'm wrong about this someone please chime in.
Anyone?

Some stuff I could see not working properly, but I'm not sure about a heating element.

 
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Old 02-02-2011, 08:16 PM   #4
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Unless there's something special about this specific element (attached electronic controller, etc), heating elements are just resistors. Should behave the same at any frequency.

 
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Old 02-02-2011, 08:16 PM   #5
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230/50hz is Europe. Link to the element?
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Old 02-02-2011, 10:09 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkarp View Post
Unless there's something special about this specific element (attached electronic controller, etc), heating elements are just resistors. Should behave the same at any frequency.
Yeah, I REALLY don't think the frequency of the power matters.

When I was in the Army in Europe, we used a US clothes iron with a transformer. It worked then, and still works.

 
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Old 02-02-2011, 10:50 PM   #7
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The Hz doesn't matter.

But note that it is a 230V element. If you run it at 240V, you will get more than 4000W out of it (4366W, to be specific).

Edit: if you run it at 220V, you will get 3660W out of it.
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Old 02-02-2011, 11:24 PM   #8
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Shows that I only know enough about electric to get in trouble.

I thought that the 4000W wouldn't change if you went from 230V to 240V.

I thought that the amps drawn would go from 17.4 to 16.7.

So, you're saying that the amperage is constant and the wattage changes?

 
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Old 02-02-2011, 11:32 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnOldUR View Post
Shows that I only know enough about electric to get in trouble.

I thought that the 4000W wouldn't change if you went from 230V to 240V.

I thought that the amps drawn would go from 17.4 to 16.7.

So, you're saying that the amperage is constant and the wattage changes?
No, the amps are not constant either. The only thing constant about it is that it is a resistor of a certain size. The "rating" they give you always specifies a wattage and a voltage, which means that you will get 'that' wattage if (and only if) you run it at 'that' voltage.

Run it at any other voltage and the current drawn and power produced start to change.

IN this case, advertised as 4000W/230V, the thing is a 13.2 Ohm resistor. The math for this is based on two basic electrical equations.

P = I * I * R
and
V = I * R, which is the same as I = V/R

So, plug that back into the Power equation as
P = (V/R) * (V/R) * R = (V*V*R)/(R*R) = (V*V)/R
and solve for R
R = V*V/P
R = 230*230/4000 = 13.2


If you put a 13.2 Ohm resistor on 120V (as an extreme example)...

V = I * R
120 = I * 13.2
120 / 13.2 = I = 9A

And Power is

P = I * I * R
P = 9 * 9 * 13.2 = 1089Watt
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Old 02-02-2011, 11:47 PM   #10
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Ahhh. So, it's the resistance that is constant to the element.




I took and course in electronics about 35 years ago while doing my toolmakers apprenticeship. Those equations look familiar, but I'll file that under "use it or loose it."

Thanks for setting me straight.



 
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