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Old 01-11-2011, 03:33 PM   #1
cheezydemon3
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The biggest difference in my cooking of meats has come from the cooking of meats to a specific temperature, rather than a time.

If making BBQ, then yes, it is measured in hours. You go past "just cooked" into the realm of still delicious, but falling off the bone.

The most extreme example is the thanksgiving turkey for me. If you time turkey, it has to err on the side of caution, because underdone will make you sick. If you wait for the little plastic thingy to pop, there is no saving that bird, dump on the gravy.

We now have turkey 4-5 times a year. I cook it to 165F and take it out of the heat.

My digital thermometer goes off when it is done, no guesswork.

Even the white meat is moist and delicious. A different animal from my grandmothers turkey.

Pork loin is the same deal. If you aren't cooking by temp, you have to err on the side of caution and overcook it. To temp? Moist and delicious.



 
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Old 01-11-2011, 04:15 PM   #2
dataz722
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Only thing that should ever get cooked to solely time is pasta, and even that not so much to an extent.


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Old 01-11-2011, 04:26 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon3 View Post
The biggest difference in my cooking of meats has come from the cooking of meats to a specific temperature, rather than a time.

If making BBQ, then yes, it is measured in hours. You go past "just cooked" into the realm of still delicious, but falling off the bone.

The most extreme example is the thanksgiving turkey for me. If you time turkey, it has to err on the side of caution, because underdone will make you sick. If you wait for the little plastic thingy to pop, there is no saving that bird, dump on the gravy.

We now have turkey 4-5 times a year. I cook it to 165F and take it out of the heat.

My digital thermometer goes off when it is done, no guesswork.

Even the white meat is moist and delicious. A different animal from my grandmothers turkey.

Pork loin is the same deal. If you aren't cooking by temp, you have to err on the side of caution and overcook it. To temp? Moist and delicious.
I try to tell people this all the time. My Martha Stewart digital thermometer can be set to go off at certain temperatures. It's also great for brewing, I set it to get off at 208F, just before a boil starts so I know when to add my hops.
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I think a more pertinent question is where is AB and Miller Coors getting all of their horse urine?
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Old 01-11-2011, 04:29 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by jbrookeiv View Post
I set it to get off at 208F, just before a boil starts so I know when to add my hops.
unless the air pressure is under 28 inHg, then you're already at boiling!


 
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Old 01-11-2011, 04:34 PM   #5
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Also, with bbq it really isn't temp as much as it is feel too. Some butts for example will be done at 185-190 while some others need close to 205.
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Old 01-11-2011, 04:53 PM   #6
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I want to purchase this.

http://gifts.barnesandnoble.com/sear...at-Thermometer
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Old 01-11-2011, 04:54 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by motobrewer View Post
unless the air pressure is under 28 inHg, then you're already at boiling!

I live at sea level.

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Water boils at 100 degrees Celsius or 212 degrees Fahrenheit under standard conditions at sea level (at one atmosphere of pressure).

Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_th...#ixzz1AkLYZXLr
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Old 01-11-2011, 05:04 PM   #8
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I absolutely agree. I always cook to temp these days. The other key is letting the meat warm to ambient temp for a couple of hours before cooking starts. It helps to ensure the meat heats through evenly so you're not over cooking the outside while waiting on the inside to catch up.
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Old 01-11-2011, 05:11 PM   #9
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I agree. Another thing to consider is carry-over cooking. If you want your Turkey to end up at 165, pull it out at about 160, and the heat will carry it up to 165.

I also thing published and suggested temps are too high. I usually pull turkey at 155, and consider beef rare at 118-122.

Gremlyn, I have done that a few times with prime cuts and agree with you. It cooks much more evenly, and any marinade gets in better.

 
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Old 01-11-2011, 05:29 PM   #10
cheezydemon3
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Absolutely Sean. Especially a large bird will carry over more heat after removal from the grill, smoker, or oven.

SWMBO is a little overcautious, so we compromise, pulling the turkey at 165F. It gets to 171F or so.

Even then, it is so much more moist and delicious that the 180F recommended by the terrorists in the "We likes our turkey DRY" federation, or the "plastic poppers know best" association.



 
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