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Old 12-25-2010, 12:14 AM   #1
gnatp2
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Not sure if this is the right forum or not, but....

I currently have a 4 gallon induction compatible stockpot that i do my mashing in. I would like to step it up to a larger 10-15 gal pot for a full boil. I have been doing a bit of research and have found some larger induction compatible pots, but I think I'd rather have one with a valve and a thermometer already attached (like the Blichmann or Polarware kettles). I'm contemplating the DIY method of trying to rig it myself, but I think i'd rather just spend the money and make sure I have a proper kettle.

Anyone know of a kettle out there that is induction compatible or will I just have to go out and try to construct it myself?

Nate



 
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Old 12-25-2010, 01:51 AM   #2
digg1es
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To work properly with an induction burner the pot material needs to be magnetic, ie: any form of steel or iron. Blichmann kettles should work great. A kettle with a stainless/aluminum bottom would work great as well.

I've never used one myself, but I would imagine that it would work fairly well, as there is no energy waste as the heat is generated by the pot itself.



 
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Old 12-25-2010, 02:24 AM   #3
gnatp2
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Can anyone verify that these kettles are magnetic? (induction compatible?)

 
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Old 12-25-2010, 03:03 AM   #4
samc
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Stainless is not a good idea with induction unless it has an encapsulated bottom with other metals that are magnetic. I'd think Blichmann pots would be a fail with induction.

 
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Old 12-25-2010, 04:48 PM   #5
Sawdustguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samc View Post
Stainless is not a good idea with induction unless it has an encapsulated bottom with other metals that are magnetic. I'd think Blichmann pots would be a fail with induction.
Sam, you are 100% correct.


Quote:
Originally Posted by digg1es View Post
To work properly with an induction burner the pot material needs to be magnetic, ie: any form of steel or iron. Blichmann kettles should work great. A kettle with a stainless/aluminum bottom would work great as well.

I've never used one myself, but I would imagine that it would work fairly well, as there is no energy waste as the heat is generated by the pot itself.
If you have not tried it, you should not recommend it, because you are wrong. Blichmann Kettles are made of 304 Stainless Steel. Essentially, the addition of nickel to the stainless steel compound helps to strengthen the protective qualities of the chromium. Generally referred to as a 300 series, stainless steel that contains nickel is not magnetic at all. The reason is that the presence of the nickel alters the physical structure of the stainless steel and removes or inhibits any magnetic qualities.

However, magnetic stainless steel does exist. The 400 series, which contains steel and chromium, but without the presence of nickel, does in fact exhibit magnetic qualities. While the degree of magnetic attraction may vary, it is not unusual for items made with the 400 series stainless steel to provide enough attraction to interact with magnets, and in some cases to allow small metal items to adhere to the stainless steel surface.
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Old 12-25-2010, 08:19 PM   #6
daugenet
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I got a 8.75 gal pot from overstock that has served me well. I have an induction cook top and I think they are the way to go!

 
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Old 12-26-2010, 04:07 PM   #7
digg1es
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My mistake on the Blichmann pots. I incorrectly assumed that since all kitchen manufacturers use an induction compatible stainless that the Blichmann would too. Maybe they should switch to using a 400 series thicker ply stainless and they would also get rid of those warping problems they seem to have.

 
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Old 12-27-2010, 01:02 AM   #8
WAORGANY
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Aluminum last time I check also is not magnetic...I know we recently went around and check all of our pots and pans, about ready to re do kitchen and leaning towards an induction stove...might need almost all new cook ware!!!
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Old 02-07-2011, 05:46 PM   #9
gnatp2
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For anyone with an induction cooktop, I've made 2 kettles using the pots for overstock (http://www.overstock.com/Home-Garden...6/product.html) and they have worked very well. Drilled 2 out for bulkheads with ball valves and temperature probes. They worked extremely well and were a great price. Drilling the holes is kindof a pain, but it wasn't too hard.

 
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Old 02-12-2011, 12:05 AM   #10
csj
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I have been using 120v induction cooktops (a 1500W Eurodib and now a Max Burton 1800W with stainless steel top) for almost two years and like the convenience. With the 1800W and a 10-gallon pot I can get 6 gallons to temp in about 45 minutes. I had an issue with not getting a rapid enough boil with the kettle w/o lid, but I use a large pizza pan with 6 huge holes drilled in it to cover the pot and it gets roiling quickly. This way I get a boil but also have evaporation.
The induction plates are very easy to use and can offer temperatures like 140 or 150 for mashing and 170 and higher (up to 425) for boiling. They will time-out after 2 hours and shut down, but they hold temps very well and cost me less than $90 each. I found the 10-gallon induction pot for a bit over $125 at Corrado's and it has worked very well. The downsides are that they might not have the temp stops you need (check the specs before you buy), the glass cooktops are fragile, there is a bit of carmelization, and the energy draw means you have to be careful about overloading a line. I have broken two but they let me brew anyplace where there is an outlet.



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