Coldbreak Brewing HERMS Giveaway!

HomeBrewSupply AMCYL Brew Kettle Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Is water that big of a deal in all grain?
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-24-2010, 04:03 PM   #11
coypoo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Cary, NC
Posts: 638
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts

Default

I think initially getting the AG process down is more important than understanding the water chemistry. If you can drink your tap water, then you can brew with it. Once you are comfortable with brewing, then you can start diving into the water


coypoo is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2010, 04:26 PM   #12
Hermit
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Alternate Universe
Posts: 2,262
Liked 70 Times on 59 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coypoo View Post
I think initially getting the AG process down is more important than understanding the water chemistry. If you can drink your tap water, then you can brew with it. Once you are comfortable with brewing, then you can start diving into the water
To a point. If you don't understand the water chemistry you don't really understand the results. You may, or may not, get satisfactory results. You could end up trying to correct something in your process when it is the water. That is what I like about AJ's sticky. It is a nice, easy starting point and not really much added effort to an all grain brew. I'm simply in the process of eliminating negatives in my beers. The water primer has helped immensely.


Hermit is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2010, 06:55 PM   #13
KAMMEE
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Peoria, Illinois
Posts: 388
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

The Water Chemistry Primer is a really good and simple starting point. Just follow those guidelines for making your first brew, then read about the water chemistry and absorb what you can. You can tweak as needed, but AJ really has put together the most basic guidelines for starting with RO water that covers a wide variety of styles.
KAMMEE is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2010, 01:11 PM   #14
djt17
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
djt17's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Central MN
Posts: 766
Liked 47 Times on 44 Posts
Likes Given: 509

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coypoo View Post
I think initially getting the AG process down is more important than understanding the water chemistry. If you can drink your tap water, then you can brew with it. Once you are comfortable with brewing, then you can start diving into the water
My water tastes good; but, due to it's very high alkalinity, it makes terrible beer. Thanks to ajdelange's water tips; I am finally making great beer.
djt17 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2010, 02:57 PM   #15
Bobby_M
Vendor and Brewer
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 4 reviews
 
Bobby_M's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Whitehouse Station, NJ
Posts: 22,752
Liked 1300 Times on 854 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

Water is a big deal if it is far out of range for the type of beer you're trying to brew. The hard thing is knowing when that situation exists. An example would be trying to brew a 2 SRM lambic with highly alkaline water. How about a Munich Helles using water with 300ppm Sulfate? You might brew with your tap water and it's fine but it really is a regional thing. It would be best to find someone who has water data for your system but in the meantime, go ahead and give it a shot with the water you have (unless it runs through a water softener).
__________________
Welcome to BrewHardware.com. I love you.
New 100% Stainless Steel Heating Elements are IN! ULWD 5500w Ripple, 2000w, 1500w, etc
Chugger Pumps, Pump Kits, Camlocks, Sightglasses, Clear USA made Silicone Tubing, RIMS, Electric Install Parts, etc.
Bobby_M is online now
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2010, 04:02 PM   #16
bctdi
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: N.W. Atlanta Metro,GA
Posts: 249
Liked 10 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

One of the biggest things you can do is filter out the chlorine or chloramine from your water if you can taste it.I went for the longest time thinking my water tasted "normal" until I got a charcoal filter installed....from that point forward, my coffee tasted better, my water tasted better, and my beer tasted better....I just didn`t realize I was tasting it until it was gone. As far as the mineral adjustments, I would look into what is in your water first to see where you stand (is your water soft? hard? or somewhere in between?)...then only adjust the water if you have your process down and you know you have a solid recipe , but something still is off a little about the beer. Water can be complicated to adjust properly and you don`t want to start messing with the water if you still don`t have your process down or if you may have a recipe issue. That being said I think a previous poster hit the nail on the head with water adjustments can mean the difference between a good beer and a great one.


bctdi is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
North Penn Water Authority (Montgomery Co., PA) Water Report lebshiff21 Brew Science 11 04-30-2014 10:13 PM
Water filter deal BrewSpook Brew Science 7 12-26-2010 09:02 PM
IPA water recipe - adjusting high bicarbonate water conpewter Brew Science 19 10-01-2010 05:29 PM
Water adjustment - Austin, TX water chloramines pale ale anastasis Brew Science 4 04-02-2010 05:31 PM
Tucson, AZ water profile results from water dept. herbler Brew Science 40 02-02-2010 05:31 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS