Creating my own extract recipes - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Creating my own extract recipes

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-13-2010, 02:41 PM   #1
s2cmpugh
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Richmond, VA
Posts: 245


Good day everyone. I'd like to start creating my own recipes using extracts (can't afford the AG equipment nor do I have the time), but I have no idea where to begin. I've done about 5 pre-selected kits, but really want to start creating new and different beers. All of the kits I've used so far have included specialty grains along with both LME and DME, so I feel comfortable using those aspects.

Should I download and use a software tool? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Cris P.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2010, 02:49 PM   #2
BigB
 
BigB's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2009
Shelby Twp, MI
Posts: 1,755
Liked 45 Times on 39 Posts


I personally like Beersmith because it does all of the calculations, gives me a baseline of where I want to be, and displays everything on one convenient screen. However if you didn't want to pay for one, you could use Beercalculus.hopville.com which is a free online tool.
__________________
I love the sound of an airlock bubbling in the morning. It sounds like.....VICTORY.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TxBrew
It's now degenerating into nu uh and uh huhs and it no longer serves a point.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2010, 02:53 PM   #3
boostsr20
 
boostsr20's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2010
Michigan
Posts: 805
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts


Beersmith and if your used to steeping specialty grains, your only a grain bag away from doing partial mashing which opens up more possibilities and will lower your costs. read Deathbrewers How to.

EDIT: If you have an Apple, Beer Alchemy is supposed to be good. Brew Pal is a great app for iphones.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2010, 04:32 PM   #4
HexKrak
Recipes 
 
Oct 2010
Phoenix
Posts: 725
Liked 11 Times on 11 Posts


Brewr for the Android is good for recipe creation too, or you can also use brewmasterswearhouse.com who has a brewbuilder app. Besides that, just keep reading here, and you'll pick up those little things like how crystal malt is not very fermentable.
__________________
On Deck: Chav Irish Red
Pipe Dreams: Chai Porter
Primary #1: Empty
Primary #2: Empty
Primary #3: Imperial Oatmeal Stout
Bottle Conditioning/Drinking: Brown Porter, Pale blonde session ale

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2010, 08:25 PM   #5
Marko73
 
Marko73's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2007
Clayton, North Carolina
Posts: 617
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


I would highly recommend reading up on it too. Charlie Papazian's Complete Joy of Homebrewing and Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels would be a HUGE help.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2010, 09:20 PM   #6
frazier
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Dec 2009
illinois
Posts: 1,883
Liked 159 Times on 135 Posts


Also Brewing Classic Styles has dozens of recipes that are extract + steeping grains.
__________________
~
"Anything worth doing, is worth doing slowly." ~~ Mae West

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2010, 09:58 PM   #7
rayg
Recipes 
 
Jan 2010
Mass
Posts: 354
Liked 14 Times on 13 Posts


You should be able to make a great beer with 2 cans of malt extract,
yeast and hops. All the fancy recipes won't do you any good if your
technique is no good, and the way to learn how the ingredients affect
the taste of your beer is to change one variable at a time. If I were
running a class I would have everyone make a yeast starter with
a liquid yeast, use 2 cans of malt extract and 25 IBU's of bittering
hops (your choice) and 5 IBU's of flavor hops (your choice) and
see how the result tastes. I would have them use american ale
yeast for one batch and do another exactly the same with say,
Wyeast London Ale III. Then use the same base recipe and try
different specialty malts, one at a time, and different hops, but
not changing both at once. I assume you know how to calculate
IBU's, if not get the Papazian book or one of the others recommended
here, you only need a simple calculator and pencil and paper but
if you want a computer version this one does all I need:

http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/recipator

and there are other free calculators online.

Ray
__________________
Zymotechnia Fundamentalis
Ask not for whom the beer twangs; it twangs for thee.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2010, 10:12 PM   #8
mixedbrewer
Registered User
Recipes 
 
Dec 2010
Lebanon, TN
Posts: 431
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts


To create your own recipes, you do just that. If you take the recipes from a book, or software, or web site, then its really someone else's recipe. Like rayg said, all you need it malt extract, water, and hops as a starting point. You can out whatever you want in the beer, its yours to experiment with.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2010, 11:36 PM   #9
BigB
 
BigB's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2009
Shelby Twp, MI
Posts: 1,755
Liked 45 Times on 39 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by boostsr20 View Post
...if your used to steeping specialty grains, your only a grain bag away from doing partial mashing which opens up more possibilities and will lower your costs. read Deathbrewers How to.
Great advice. Partial mash will also help expand your knowledge and provide a little bit more of flexibility.
__________________
I love the sound of an airlock bubbling in the morning. It sounds like.....VICTORY.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TxBrew
It's now degenerating into nu uh and uh huhs and it no longer serves a point.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2010, 12:07 AM   #10
jonmohno
Registered User
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Corn, High Fructose Corn Fortress, IA
Posts: 5,847
Liked 417 Times on 367 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by rayg View Post
You should be able to make a great beer with 2 cans of malt extract,
yeast and hops. All the fancy recipes won't do you any good if your
technique is no good, and the way to learn how the ingredients affect
the taste of your beer is to change one variable at a time. If I were
running a class I would have everyone make a yeast starter with
a liquid yeast, use 2 cans of malt extract and 25 IBU's of bittering
hops (your choice) and 5 IBU's of flavor hops (your choice) and
see how the result tastes. I would have them use american ale
yeast for one batch and do another exactly the same with say,
Wyeast London Ale III. Then use the same base recipe and try
different specialty malts, one at a time, and different hops, but
not changing both at once. I assume you know how to calculate
IBU's, if not get the Papazian book or one of the others recommended
here, you only need a simple calculator and pencil and paper but
if you want a computer version this one does all I need:

http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/recipator

and there are other free calculators online.

Ray
thats exactly how im starting out. i looked at recipes and certain styles and am just experimenting along with learning along the way which grains are not fermentable for steeping. if your gonna use someone elses recipe your still not using your own. chances are that the recipe they posted is probably good since they posted it though. but then again you could be learning by mistake. i would try to stay within the stlye guidlines somewhat.
I made an amber and i think i had the ibu's to high with willamette hops and am getting this fruity appely smell/taste thats too big still after 3 weeks in the bottle.dont know if it will mellow out or i just added too many hops.i liked ipa's and thought ill just add more hops, well now i have apples.ha

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to turn AG recipes into extract ones? akthor Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 11-16-2010 05:06 PM
Converting AG recipes to Extract? fightingillini Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 07-29-2010 12:06 AM
2 simple Extract recipes I made. mhermetz Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 07-25-2009 12:52 AM
Converting Extract Recipes to Partial/AG json2001 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 07-03-2009 11:09 PM
Converting AG recipes to Extract jldc Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 11-24-2008 10:34 PM


Forum Jump