Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Equipment/Sanitation > Questions about March Pumps answered by the Factory!
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Old 12-07-2010, 12:29 AM   #11
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Old 12-07-2010, 12:40 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Sawdustguy View Post
+1 Is there a reason why nobody makes an affordable self priming magnetic drive pump?
I don't know if I would want a self priming mag drive pump, reason being all mag drives I have seen are centrifugal pumps and all centrifugal self priming pumps I have seen have a "sump" to keep the pump head full of product when it stops so that next time this water can be used in the pumps special casing design to draw more product up the suction. This will mean that you would need to leave some water or something sitting in the pump between brew days (or prime on brewday). I don't have a pump (march or other) myself but work with them in my day job. But as far as I know you should not have issues with pumps "losing" prime if you have everything set up right. I have seen a lot of pumps set up with the outlet pointing vertical (so the actual outlet port is at 9 o'clock) this would be the main issue as it would not let the pump be fully flooded and a air pocket will sit at the top of the pump casing.


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Old 12-07-2010, 01:14 AM   #13
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Old 12-07-2010, 12:02 PM   #14
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Old 12-07-2010, 01:15 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by mattd2 View Post
I don't know if I would want a self priming mag drive pump, reason being all mag drives I have seen are centrifugal pumps and all centrifugal self priming pumps I have seen have a "sump" to keep the pump head full of product when it stops so that next time this water can be used in the pumps special casing design to draw more product up the suction. This will mean that you would need to leave some water or something sitting in the pump between brew days (or prime on brewday). I don't have a pump (march or other) myself but work with them in my day job. But as far as I know you should not have issues with pumps "losing" prime if you have everything set up right. I have seen a lot of pumps set up with the outlet pointing vertical (so the actual outlet port is at 9 o'clock) this would be the main issue as it would not let the pump be fully flooded and a air pocket will sit at the top of the pump casing.
I understand that. If your system is flushed properly before and after each brew, which I do anyway, I don't see why that would be a problem.
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Old 12-07-2010, 03:05 PM   #16
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I'll be interested in what you find after examining you 'competitor's' product. While making beer at home doesn't require precision instruments, attention to detail does say something about the process. Can't drill a hole fairly close to center on a casting or just don't care to? Need to get a part later? Chinese factories are notorious for only wanting to do large runs. The factory making pumps today may be making dolls tomorrow.
Thats true...and what would worry me more is all the lead laced stuff taht also comes out of China! Just the other day my wife and i were in our local ACE hardware...they had the nice little 4' x-mass tree's that were pre-lit. unpon closer inspection of the box it clearly stated a lead warning that some electical parts may contain lead
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Old 12-07-2010, 03:15 PM   #17
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Does March make any type of affordable self-priming, variable speed pump that can be used for homebrewing?
We do not unfortunately....if you want variable speed I have seen some people use dimmer switches inline in the power cords of the pumps to slow them down....not sure if that works exactly. I have also seen some people use the variable speed controllers for power tools....but if you were to go that route then just make sure its PWM (Pulse width modulation) type. That kind of speed control switches the power on and off at different frequencies but still supplies the full voltage the motor needs. The easiest (and cheapest) thing you can do to vary the flow is just install a ball valve on the discharge of the pump and choke it down to what ever you want the pump to do.
As for self priming, the issue with a true self priming pump is that it must create a suction to draw the fluid in. No centrifugal pump will do that because the impeller veins do not contact the walls of the pump housing. There are some shaft drive type centrifugal pumps that have tighter machining internally that MAY have a slight sucking ability but still wont draw fluid up and into themselves. The only way to make one of ours into a self primer is to attach some sort of priming chamber to it. We make the 750 priming reservoir that holds about 1gal of liquid. Once you fill the chamber up it will be able to draw liquid through 10' of 1" line either horizontal or vertical.
http://www.marchpump.com/documents/series_prime.htm

-Walter
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Old 12-07-2010, 03:16 PM   #18
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Huh, never would have thought the temperature rating was related to the magnets; assumed it was related to the material used in the pump head. Thanks for the info!
Its both, plastic has a melting point and magnets have a threshold they can opperate in...exceed either one and you have problems!

-Walter
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Old 12-07-2010, 03:32 PM   #19
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Walter, I have an 809 that seemed to lock up on me (temporarily). I turned it off and loosened it from it's mount, put it all back together and now it is fine. This got me thinking about routine maintenance. Can you tell us what type of routine maintenance/interval should be done to these pumps?

Thanks!
More then likely what's happening with yours is that you are getting a sugar buildup on the shaft the impeller spins on. Easiest thing you can do is take the pump apart and pass a 17/64 drill bit through the center of the impeller. Or if you happen to have a better drill index available then use a "G" drill bit.

Either you are not cleaning the pump out with clean hot water long enough or your pump may be on the tight side of tolerances when it comes to the impeller and shaft. Just as any other part made in the world they all have minimums and maximums during production. In the case of the impeller the bore hole should be between .253-.255 ID and the shaft should be .250 +/- .001 OD Now we cant check every single piece that comes off the production line so there may be parts that exceed the tolerances and you may get an impeller that's on the tight side and a shaft that's on the big side. They will work just fine but when you start pumping something thicker then water like an alcohol that has sugars in it, then you could run into situations where there is not enough lubrication between the shaft and impeller and it will literally cook the material between the two and seize up the impeller onto the shaft. By drilling out the impeller bore you give it an extra ..10 clearance that wont harm anything on the pump and will help keep things clean and clear inside the pump.

As for any other routine maint for the pump, the only thing you may or may not need to do is drop a few drops of light weight machine oil into the motor on the end caps. The white label on the motor has "oil" written on it with two arrows pointing to the outside edges. You will find a small hole and what looks like a tube/shaft inside the hole. That channel leads down tot he bearing caps where there is some wicking material soaked in oil for the sleeve bearings. Once a year is plenty as the motor mfg has told us that unless these are being used in a dirty/dusty/or very hot environment, the bearings are normally good, as is, for the life of the motor for most normal operations. I have mentioned to our marketing manager that we should do some YouTube videos showing some basic things like oiling or internal inspection and even as far as rebuilding of our pumps.....they are "thinking" about it!

-Walter
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Old 12-07-2010, 03:50 PM   #20
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Great to see March here on the boards. I have 4 809 pumps and generally, they work great. The priming issue can be a challenge at times but over time, I have become more adept and dealing with my system and priming issues.

As far as priming the pumps go, basic rule is this: Keep the pump below the liquid level and when you open the supply valve the fluid should flood the pump naturally with just gravity. The discharge of the pump should be at the highest point of the pump if possible. If you have the pump mounted horizontally, then the inlet will be on your left and outlet will be on your right when you are facing the pump. If mounted vertically then the outlet pointing to the ceiling is the best way.

What's the story with the Morebeer March pump I saw an ad for recently? They claimed faster pumping speeds with a few minor tweaks. Does this pump prime more easily than the current pumphead? Can you make suggestions as to reducing cavitation and getting things to flow a bit more easily?

That pump has the following that's different from the standard 809: Mounting base, 6' cord, and the 815 pump impeller inside.
If you are getting cavitation then its usually cause by a couple things:
1. you have a restriction on the inlet side of the pump...either the line is too small or the fittings/elbows/valves etc are restricting the flow rate to the pump.
2. you have air trapped inside the pump. Turn the pump off for a second and let gravity try and purge any air in the pump head out...make sure the outlet is the highest point of the pump.
3. you may be sucking air either from a vortex being created inside your tank or a loose connection of the supply line.


Also, how about a part number for a stainless head with opposing 1/2 NPT threads to replace the polysulfone ones I currently use? I have a great March dealer in Albuquerque I deal with and can order through them. Thanks Walter. Appreciate the homebrew love.

Unfortunately we don't make an inline version of that head The polysufone is the only option for the inline version. If you wanted a slightly beefier version of the Polysulfone head then order the 0809-0171-0100 That's the inline head but instead of 1/2"NPT threads it has 1" NPT threads on it. Just keep in mind that if you are using metal fittings on a plastic part its easy to over torque the plastic and break it.

-Walter


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