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Old 11-27-2010, 08:32 PM   #1
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Default Beer Line Length

I've been looking through a lot of foaming threads and balancing articles and I am curious if it's possible to have lines that are too long. A lot of people seem to suggest getting 10' lines. According to some equations this would balance a system for 20 PSI. Does this work at controlling foam at 12 PSI? Is there any detriment to having lines that are too long?


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Old 11-27-2010, 08:41 PM   #2
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Beer lines that are too long will simply take a lot longer to fill a glass and if extremely long you might only get a dribble. The goal is a good pour without an excess of foam. I use 10' lines on my keggerator. 10' seems like a good starting point. If you feel it's not pouring fast enough you simply cut off a foot at a time and see if foaming is an issue.


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Old 11-27-2010, 08:44 PM   #3
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In my opinion, buy 'em long and experiment with cutting them down.

I started by believing the folks at kegconnection (though they've been great with everything else) and went with 5-footers... I struggled for months with foaming at 10 psi. Finally broke down and bought new 10-foot lines... problem solved nearly instantly. Sure, some folks might say I have a slow pour, but at 10 psi and about 38-deg, I can pour my first beer on a tap that hasn't been touched in weeks, perfectly everytime. I keep thinking about cutting one back to 8 feet or so to try it, but figure why mess with what's working....

On another note... I've got one tap sporting 25 foot of line and 25-psi for root beer... perfect pours every pull.

Just start long and experiment... hose is cheap, and it's easier to cut then to add.
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Old 11-27-2010, 08:54 PM   #4
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Ok thanks. I was missing the slowing down the flow piece. Now that I think about it, it makes complete sense and I feel a bit dumb.
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Old 11-27-2010, 10:38 PM   #5
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The line length needed for your beer really depends on a few factors, the temperature of the beer and the pressure that your beer is under. This will determing how much CO2 is dissolved in your beer. Take a look at the thread that I linked below and use the excel sheet to let you know how long of a line that you need for your given pressure and temperature. The nice thing about it is that it tells you what is the general standard CO2 volume that should be in your beer based on your style if you want it.

Beer Line Length and Pressure Calculator
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Old 11-27-2010, 11:34 PM   #6
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I started with 5' and had tons of foam, at 10' it's perfect for me at 12 psi.
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Old 11-28-2010, 04:50 PM   #7
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There are a lot of beer line length calculators out there but IMO you can simply just go with 10' on all your lines and never have any problems.
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Old 08-29-2013, 11:24 AM   #8
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Default Foamy Beer

I have a strange problem:

I currently have a heffeweissen at 20 PSI, using 10 foot beer line @ 36 degrees Fahrenheit. For the first week, the pour was great. Then it started to get foamy, and now it is just foam. I have tried reducing the pressure right down to 2 PSI, same result, and the little beer that is collected is flat.

I cleaned my system when I first connected the keg, but clean the tap every other day. I use a 3/16 ID line and a proper tap with a flow controller, and I am perplexed. The temp is electronically controlled, and the keggerator has only recently been opened to fiddle with the pressures to try fix the issue.

Anyone had this issue?
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Old 08-29-2013, 01:22 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ngula View Post
I have a strange problem:

I currently have a heffeweissen at 20 PSI, using 10 foot beer line @ 36 degrees Fahrenheit. For the first week, the pour was great. Then it started to get foamy, and now it is just foam. I have tried reducing the pressure right down to 2 PSI, same result, and the little beer that is collected is flat.

I cleaned my system when I first connected the keg, but clean the tap every other day. I use a 3/16 ID line and a proper tap with a flow controller, and I am perplexed. The temp is electronically controlled, and the keggerator has only recently been opened to fiddle with the pressures to try fix the issue.

Anyone had this issue?
What's a "flow controller"? I don't know what that means.
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Old 08-29-2013, 01:28 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
What's a "flow controller"? I don't know what that means.
I think he means the Perlick 545pc with the flow controller.


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