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Old 01-29-2007, 05:33 PM   #1
vasie
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I just finished my first all-grain batch of beer yesterday but I think that I made a big mistake. I didn't vorlauf enough when catching my second runnings and I ended up letting in a fair amount of very fine grain particulate. Being a first-time all-grain brewer, I didn't realize that cloudy runoff contained actual grain bits, not just hazy protiens.

Well, I didn't realize that my error until after I boiled its for 90 minutes and then cooled it. When taking a gravity reading, I discovered that the foam from aeration was gritty! I am less concerned with the grain bits in my beer ( I can add a clarifying stage to my process) than I am about the almost-certain tannin extration that occured during my long boil.

Has anyone else done this (certainly so)? If so, how did your beer turn out? Should I expect to have to toss this batch and start preparing to start over? Do you have any advice on how to get the grains bits out of the wort? Anything else I should know?

I should post some pics and my brew log on my brewer's weblob in the next few days. http://brewbaron.wordpress.com

 
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Old 01-29-2007, 05:38 PM   #2
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Don't worry about it. The tannin is in the husk not the actual grain.
The beer'll be good.
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Old 01-29-2007, 05:46 PM   #3
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And the husks are stronger than the grain, so they stay in larger particles and in the tun.
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Old 01-29-2007, 06:04 PM   #4
vasie
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So what would be the best way to get the rest of it out. I understand that most of it will settle out, but do you all think that I will need to filter it? I figure I can rig something up to use coffee filters or grain bags.

 
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Old 01-29-2007, 06:12 PM   #5
Orfy
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It depends what type of manifold/strainer you use. If it's effective and you vorlauf then you shouldn't need to filter. I don't think anyone else does.
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Old 01-29-2007, 07:10 PM   #6
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your grain bed IS your filter.

just vorlauf more. I usually recirculate at least a gallon, and still use a strainer to keep everything that may make it through out of the kettle
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Old 01-29-2007, 07:15 PM   #7
mysterio
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I vorlauf about 5 or 6 litres before I start draining, but I wouldn't worry too much. First couple of batches I didnt bother and I've never had any noticeable tannins.

 
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Old 01-29-2007, 07:55 PM   #8
vasie
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Yes, I understand how the grainbed is supposed to filter out these bits of grain. My question is, now that I do have bits of grain in my wort, has anyone figured out an effective way to get them out beyond just careful syphoning.

 
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Old 01-29-2007, 09:33 PM   #9
adamk222
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it will settle out in the primary and secondary.if need be use a grain bag when you transferto the secondary and the bottleing bucket or keg. the grain will usualy settle out first then be covered by the yeast and held to the bottom of the fermenter.

 
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Old 01-29-2007, 10:34 PM   #10
BierMuncher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vasie
Yes, I understand how the grainbed is supposed to filter out these bits of grain. My question is, now that I do have bits of grain in my wort, has anyone figured out an effective way to get them out beyond just careful syphoning.
Vasie, I have a similar situation with cold break trub in my fermenter.

Not sure how it will work but here's my plan:

I went to Lowes and in the paint department bought a 2-pack of "paint strainer" cloths. (about $3.00) I plan on cutting out about a 5 inch patch and shaping it loosely into a balloon-like ball and securing to the end of my racking tube with a hose clamp and racking to my secondary. (All sanitized of course) This should provide enough surface area to avoid it getting clogged but the strainer material (from what I've heard on this forum) should be fine enought to catch most everything you don't want. I'm trying to trap trub, but I'd bet it would certainly catch any particulate like you're describing.

Anyone have any opinions on this idea?

 
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