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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Kegerators and Keezers > Keezer - How did you (or will) put your collar together?
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Old 11-10-2010, 11:47 AM   #1
Indyking
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Default Keezer - How did you (or will) put your collar together?

I'm getting ready to buy the stuff for my collar, but can't decide about what to use to put it together.

I was going to use liquid nails to glue the lumber boards together on the corners or maybe just the Carpenter's wood glue (the yellow one, you know), but I have seen others using just plain silicone calk instead.

I checked with Lowes and they told me the silicone was probably not a good idea for a keezer (after I explained what a keezer is, that is) because it is not true glue, although they admitted that insulation would be better compared to liquid nails.

They also suggested gorilla glue may actually be the best option because it resists against water very well in case I get condensation into the crevices.

To attach the collar to the freezer, I think the silicone is probably the best option, again, because of the insulation issue, but Iím not sure.

So, I wonder what everybody else is using and why?
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Old 11-10-2010, 12:58 PM   #2
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L brackets, screws and the [yellow] wood glue. I sandwiched a layer of high density weather stripping material between the freezer lip and collar bottom, and used the brackets and screws to hold it tight. It looks great, there are no leaks that I can see, and no messy glue cleanup.
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Old 11-10-2010, 01:01 PM   #3
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I built my collar out of 2 x 6 pine. I used Gorilla glue and dowel pins. The corners are butt joints, not mitered. The Gorilla glue (urethane glue) is very strong when properly used. I used bar clamps to hold it together until the glue set. I used rope type weather stripping caulk to attach the collar to the freezer. No glue, screws or brackets were used. The caulk is somewhat sticky, so it has some adhesive properties. It's very easy to use and also very easy to remove if desired. It's cheap too.:

http://www.hardwareandtools.com/M-D-...y-3439247.html
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Old 11-10-2010, 01:31 PM   #4
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I used titebond II for its "waterproofness". I also used pocket holes/screws in the corners, but if you don't already have the jig it would be a rather expensive way to go.
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Old 11-10-2010, 01:52 PM   #5
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Talk to a friend who is really into DIY stuff, especially with wood. I told him I want to avoid drilling into the freezer, so no L brackets, and want to use something that could be removed later on in case... you know... someone who we must obey ask for the original freezer back

He is in favor of titlebond between the wood boards because it seals damn well and will resist the microweather created by the freezer. Carpenter's glue, liquid nail, and Gorilla glue are all good options for their strong adhesive properties, but they are less likely to resist the microweather, according to him. Would you guys agree with that?

BTW, he also recommends using screws at pre-drilled holes between the wood boards right after glueing the pieces together to help sealing well while that glue is still hardening.

To attach the wood collar to the freezer edge, he said I'm stuck with caulk (liquid or strip type) because even tough it's not a good adhesive, it will help with insulation and could easily be removed without damaging the freezer edge. I think the vast majority here have or is planning to use caulk, so I think I'm good, but still debating about the wood to wood adhesion.
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Old 11-10-2010, 03:18 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indyking View Post
Talk to a friend who is really into DIY stuff, especially with wood. I told him I want to avoid drilling into the freezer, so no L brackets, and want to use something that could be removed later on in case... you know... someone who we must obey ask for the original freezer back

He is in favor of titlebond between the wood boards because it seals damn well and will resist the microweather created by the freezer. Carpenter's glue, liquid nail, and Gorilla glue are all good options for their strong adhesive properties, but they are less likely to resist the microweather, according to him. Would you guys agree with that?

BTW, he also recommends using screws at pre-drilled holes between the wood boards right after glueing the pieces together to help sealing well while that glue is still hardening.

To attach the wood collar to the freezer edge, he said I'm stuck with caulk (liquid or strip type) because even tough it's not a good adhesive, it will help with insulation and could easily be removed without damaging the freezer edge. I think the vast majority here have or is planning to use caulk, so I think I'm good, but still debating about the wood to wood adhesion.
Titebond (I think it's Titebond II that you want), Liquid Nails or Gorilla glue will all work well. The Gorilla glue I used is waterproof, but I also painted the collar with a urethane finish, so it's well sealed and the glue is not directly exposed to moisture. It's held up well for several years without any problems. The weatherstrip caulk is not a glue, but it does have some adhesive properties. The collar does not slip or move at all, but then it is subjected to very little lateral force. The weight of the collar helps hold it in place. I don't think that the insulating properties of whatever you use to attach the collar to the lid will make a noticeable difference. I am about to insulate the collar on my freezer and I've figured out a way to have the insulation overlap the joint anyway.
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Old 11-10-2010, 03:29 PM   #7
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Glue and screws and mitered corners.
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Old 11-10-2010, 04:10 PM   #8
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L brackets to hold the collar together, Gorilla Glue to attach it to the freezer.
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Old 11-10-2010, 04:48 PM   #9
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Quote:
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L brackets to hold the collar together, Gorilla Glue to attach it to the freezer.
That's what I originally thought of doing, but like I said, I want no damage to the freezer. The brackets would require drilliong holes on it and the collar would never been able to be removed without damaging the surface edge if glued with gorilla glue. I have gorilla glued furniture before and I can tell it's easier to break the wood around it than dettach the glued surfaces...
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Old 11-10-2010, 04:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catt22 View Post
Titebond (I think it's Titebond II that you want), Liquid Nails or Gorilla glue will all work well. The Gorilla glue I used is waterproof, but I also painted the collar with a urethane finish, so it's well sealed and the glue is not directly exposed to moisture. It's held up well for several years without any problems. The weatherstrip caulk is not a glue, but it does have some adhesive properties. The collar does not slip or move at all, but then it is subjected to very little lateral force. The weight of the collar helps hold it in place. I don't think that the insulating properties of whatever you use to attach the collar to the lid will make a noticeable difference. I am about to insulate the collar on my freezer and I've figured out a way to have the insulation overlap the joint anyway.

Did you use the gorilla glue to bind the collar to the freezer as well? I don't know if titebond II and liquid nails would bind to the freezer plastic as well as it does on wood.
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