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Old 11-12-2010, 12:22 AM   #11
Yooper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CampFireWine View Post
I am 5 to 7 days in primary and 5 to 7 days in secondary then bottle and drink. From start to finish in 2 weeks. I have only dumped 1 batch out of the dozen or so i have made so far. I couldn't in no way wait a year.
That's surprising- do you have a problem with sediment in your bottles? My wines aren't always clear even after 4-6 months. I can't even imagine thinking about bottling them in 2 weeks, let alone two months!

I have a beautiful crabapple wine that I racked today that can be bottled soon. It's not dropping lees anymore, and it's been completely clear for a while. I made it on March 7 of this year, and I hope to bottle it by the end of this year.


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Old 11-12-2010, 12:45 AM   #12
Justibone
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Wine changes dramatically over time.



 
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Old 11-12-2010, 02:16 AM   #13
CampFireWine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper_Brew View Post
That's surprising- do you have a problem with sediment in your bottles? My wines aren't always clear even after 4-6 months. I can't even imagine thinking about bottling them in 2 weeks, let alone two months!

I have a beautiful crabapple wine that I racked today that can be bottled soon. It's not dropping lees anymore, and it's been completely clear for a while. I made it on March 7 of this year, and I hope to bottle it by the end of this year.
Sometimes I will get some pectin, gel that holds the fruit together, precipitate a little further in the bottle. I make sure the yeast is dead with campden and sorbate when I rack to secondary. All the yeast and most pectin will drop out within a week. Once it goes from a creamy color back close to the original color, it is drinkable. The pectin seems not to have a lot of impact on flavor. When it gets bottled, it is all given out and drank with the month before the next batch is ready, so it doesn't stay in the bottle long. Now winter is here I have less friends over and it last and ages a little longer.

Here is a pic of watermelon wine, fermented a week, and bulk aged 3 weeks. I started thieving drinks from the secondary after a day or two, swiping bottles from it within a week.



 
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Old 11-12-2010, 02:40 AM   #14
CampFireWine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justibone View Post
Wine changes dramatically over time.
I had a wine once that changed 4 different colors in the fermenter as the fruit broke down. It was strawberry red, kiwi green, pink and another color. I thought that was pretty dramatic but I dumped the batch out. It was like tasting razor blades. No other description. That was the first and only time I used pectic enzymes. I am not sure if that was what caused it, but after that I read if the pectin isn't hurting anything, then leave it alone. The enzymes just delay things anyway in my case.

Aging wine gives the alcohol and fruit molecules time to move around and bind together. It can be done naturally through the rotation of the earth or it can be introduced through mechanical means at a faster pace. Lets say you stick your carboy on a lazy susan and turned the bottle in a circle a few times an hour. This would move the molecules around and bind them rapidly. Now lets say you add a motor and a timer to rotate the bottles in a circle for you. Now thats what I am working towards building but maybe not with those exact parts. I use a similar technique now.


 
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Old 11-12-2010, 03:14 AM   #15
DrJerryrigger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CampFireWine View Post
Aging wine gives the alcohol and fruit molecules time to move around and bind together. It can be done naturally through the rotation of the earth or it can be introduced through mechanical means at a faster pace. Lets say you stick your carboy on a lazy susan and turned the bottle in a circle a few times an hour. This would move the molecules around and bind them rapidly. Now lets say you add a motor and a timer to rotate the bottles in a circle for you. Now thats what I am working towards building but maybe not with those exact parts. I use a similar technique now.
I remember hearing about someone who found a spot in the ocean to age wine so the waves rocked them; there by aging them faster.
I know next to nothing on the chemistry of this, but I'm quite interested as to what the ideal rate of movement would be.

 
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Old 11-12-2010, 04:09 AM   #16
CampFireWine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrJerryrigger View Post
I remember hearing about someone who found a spot in the ocean to age wine so the waves rocked them; there by aging them faster.
I know next to nothing on the chemistry of this, but I'm quite interested as to what the ideal rate of movement would be.
I had to look that one up. They age their bottles in the Indian Ocean. Pretty good idea. I make my wine on a houseboat. It is always moving around in the wind and with boats going by. It isn't a hard enough rock to stir up the bottom, just enough to move the liquid around a bit. I am thinking about 1 rotation a minute should work in a simulated environment, but I would have to experiment some more. I would like to come up with a way anybody can get a similar result as I do.


 
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Old 11-12-2010, 04:26 AM   #17
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even knowing how stuff changes with fermentation, my stomach rebels at this thought
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Old 11-12-2010, 11:46 AM   #18
Justibone
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Okay.

It is more likely that the moon would change your wine than the motion of the earth.

Enjoy your brewing!

 
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Old 12-06-2010, 03:34 PM   #19
B0whunt3r
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Oct 2010
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Well I starterd my experiment, and it turn out rather interesting. I used 3 quarts of Campbell's Tomato juice and 1/4 bottle of tabasco added sugar to get the gravity to what I think was 1.080. (I'm not sure how accurate it is since tomato juice is a thicker juice than most others and I think it might effect the Hydrometer.) I also added yeast nutrient, pectin enzime and pitched the yeast. So far everything seems alright and going according to plan.

Now things took an unexpected turn. I learned that canned tomato juice is more of a really thin tomato paste. After about 5 days in the primary it seperated into liquid and a sludge that was the consistancy of spagetti sauce. the must was 60% sludge and 40% liquid. I kept mixing it every day till fermentation stopped. When it came time to rack I wanted to get all the liquid possible, so i mixed it up and strained it through a nylon straining bag. This removed about 30% of the sludge. Than I doubled over the bag put that in a cullunder and strained it again. This got another 40% of the sludge and left me with 3 quarts of liquid. I topped if off with a little sugar water and more tobasco because when I tasted it there wasn't much spice and i was a little weak on alchohol. So after 1 week in the secoundary it seperated again I had about 2 inches of sludge in the bottom of my jug I racked the liquid off the sludge into a clean jug and that's were I'm at.

I tasted it after my last rack and it has a very interesting flavor. Kinda bold fruit flavor with a nice kick of tobasco in the after taste. Not sure I like it, I don't dislike it, but it's like nothing I've ever tried. I figure I either have an interesting sipping wine that will go good with mexican food or a really awesome cooking wine. I'm going to try both. Marinating a couple of steaks in it and throwing them on the grill should be unbelieveable.

 
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Old 12-06-2010, 04:17 PM   #20
Justibone
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Nice! Glad it worked out for ya, and those steaks sound delicious right now...

*stomach rumbles*
*checks clock for lunch time*

Anyway, most of the time it's best to just go ahead and use established recipes the first (and maybe second) time you make any particular style or type of wine.



 
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