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Old 10-30-2010, 04:35 PM   #1
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Default v-shaped mash profile?

I just picked up a PM Maibock kit from my LHBS. The instruction call for mash-in-a-bag starting at 162 F, then let it cool to 122 F while stirring, then reheat to 158 F. I'm a relative newbie, but I am used to seeing a single temperature mash, then a single temperature sparge. Is there a benefit to doing it the way they recommend, or just unnecessarily complicated?


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Old 10-31-2010, 02:43 AM   #2
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I am just as much a newbie to all-grain, but this puzzles the hell out of me. The enzymes that operate at the lower temperatures (your protein-breakers, the proteases) would be denatured during your initial ramp-up, rendering them useless (or at least, less useful).

I think your alpha-amylase would survive, though since it would seem the betas would be getting first crack at the sugars your wort would overall be sweeter and less fermentable. So basically, you would get a slightly dextrin wort. My guess is you would probably have really good extraction doing it this way, that's the only reason I can think of.


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Old 10-31-2010, 03:00 AM   #3
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I say just do it at 158 and call it a day. I have never seen a v shaped profile before, and it doesn't make sense to go to the hotter temperature first.
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Old 10-31-2010, 03:05 AM   #4
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Since a maibock is traditionally a lager style, I'm guessing that you purchased an ale version and they are *trying* to add a protein rest to help mimic the lager's clarity. If this is a kit that they created, I would say your LHBS messed up the order of the steps accidentally or just outright don't know what they are doing.

If you want, you can switch the order of the steps, or likely skip it all together and just do the higher step. I would keep it at 160 though to be safe.
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Old 10-31-2010, 03:35 AM   #5
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I agree. I can see a step at 122 for protein rest, and then a step at 158-160, but not one at 158 and one at 162. If they wanted to to beta and alpha rests I would imagine they would be somewhere around 145ish and 158ish.
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Old 10-31-2010, 04:41 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airborneguy View Post
Since a maibock is traditionally a lager style, I'm guessing that you purchased an ale version and they are *trying* to add a protein rest to help mimic the lager's clarity. If this is a kit that they created, I would say your LHBS messed up the order of the steps accidentally or just outright don't know what they are doing.

If you want, you can switch the order of the steps, or likely skip it all together and just do the higher step. I would keep it at 160 though to be safe.
yes, that's exactly what is is - they gave me Wyeast American Ale yeast and said to ferment at 65-70, so I guess they're trying to mimic a lager? Is is common to include multiple steps for lager styles, or can it benefit ales too?
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Old 10-31-2010, 12:02 PM   #7
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It's more common in lagers, but a protein rest can benefit an ale. It will help cut down or eliminate haze and in this case, will also cause the beer to have less head formation, which is more lager-like.

If you can, try to ferment even lower, around 62. According to Wyeast, 1056 can tolerate down to 60. The colder you ferment it, the closer you can get it to a maibock profile.
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Old 10-31-2010, 01:21 PM   #8
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I'd keep the saach rest temp down around 150*F. Traditional Maibocks are a fermentable wort that finishes dry. Like Airborneguy said.. the 1056 will ferment down below 60*F, so 62*F is a good temp to keep a clean crisp lager like brew. The base is pils malt, the maltiness comes from the munich and some carapils will add the body, a little light and medium crystals give some toasty caramel notes. Yumm! making me thirsty. darkess helles on steroids! haha


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