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Old 09-08-2013, 12:32 AM   #321
markjd
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May 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjd View Post
Brewing a 10L (2.5G) batch of this recipe now.

Leffe Blonde was one of my favourite beers on tap at one of the local pubs; really looking forward to see how this recipe turns out.
Bottled this morning after one month in primary. FG was a little higher than expected at 1.016, but I think that may be due to being a little high with my mash temp.

 
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Old 09-08-2013, 06:29 PM   #322
stevemej
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May 2013
Leeds, West Yorkshire
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Originally Posted by markjd View Post
Bottled this morning after one month in primary. FG was a little higher than expected at 1.016, but I think that may be due to being a little high with my mash temp.
My first 29l Batch was a bit light on alcohol (i think my final gravity was about 1.020. I simply calculated how much sugar to add another 1% alcohol and allowed a second fermentation prior to bottling (tertiary) .

It was delicious, especially after about a month.

I just bottled a 2nd 29l batch about 2 weeks ago. Again the fg was a bit short and the og seemed abit light too so I added enough sugar to add a couple of % alcohol. I'm going on holiday for a week on tuesday and look forward to tasting the first bottle on my return.

good luck.

 
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Old 09-23-2013, 11:58 AM   #323
timcadieux
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May 2011
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So after 3 weeks I still have a thick, creamy layer on my beer. I read that this was a top cropping yeast so I presume that that is what's different here.
Do I news to rack from under this layer or do i just bottle from unfer it?
What to do, what to do
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Old 09-24-2013, 02:58 AM   #324
Albionwood
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Apr 2013
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Thanks for this recipe and all the great discussion that followed - I brewed up something close last month, kegged it yesterday, and the flat samples taste GREAT so I can't wait to tap it. Used Mangrove Jack's M27 and it definitely has that spicy twang that I wanted - a nice surprise from a dry yeast. Also dried the beer out very well, down to 1.008.

 
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Old 10-05-2013, 02:12 PM   #325
joety
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjd View Post
Bottled this morning after one month in primary. FG was a little higher than expected at 1.016, but I think that may be due to being a little high with my mash temp.
This is my fear as well. The Mash temp is 158 is the recipe and the final gravity is 1.010. I just don't think it will finish that low with that high of a mash temp. I will take my first reading in the next couple days, but if I end up in your range I will consider dosing with the 3711 superyeast.
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Old 11-17-2013, 06:33 PM   #326
NurseJackie
 
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FWIW: I brewed this on 10/16 following the recipe as written but subbing wlp500 for 530. Mashed at 158. Held temps at 65-66 degrees (internal, not ambient) for about a week at which point SG was 1.022. Gradually raised temp to 78 and held for about 2 more weeks until FG = 1.011. Crash cooled, bottling today. Smells and tastes excellent. Lesson: don't fear the mash temp, keep your yeast happy and be patient

 
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Old 12-03-2013, 01:58 PM   #327
AT_II
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Dec 2013
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Originally Posted by homebrewdad View Post
Boil for 30 more minutes. Chill the beer to ~70 degrees (a bit cooler is better). Move to fermenter, aerate, pitch yeast. Leave it alone for 3-4 weeks.
First, thanks to revvy for this awesome recipe and homebrewdad for some great insight.

I am very much a newb but am excited to try to brew this recipe. I have done a fair amount of research and watched several videos on brewing belgian ales. I feel comfortable that I can take on the recipe with the help of a friend. However, there are two things that were not clear to me:

1. When transferring from the brew pot to the fermenter, how do you typically aerate?
2. When you are ready to bottle, do you still need priming sugar (or does the sugar in the recipe count as the priming sugar)?

 
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Old 12-03-2013, 02:41 PM   #328
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AT_II View Post
First, thanks to revvy for this awesome recipe and homebrewdad for some great insight.

I am very much a newb but am excited to try to brew this recipe. I have done a fair amount of research and watched several videos on brewing belgian ales. I feel comfortable that I can take on the recipe with the help of a friend. However, there are two things that were not clear to me:

1. When transferring from the brew pot to the fermenter, how do you typically aerate?
2. When you are ready to bottle, do you still need priming sugar (or does the sugar in the recipe count as the priming sugar)?
1. These days, I personally aerate with pure O2 for 60 seconds or so. If you don't have pure oxygen, simply slosh the beer back and forth in the fermenter for a minute or two. This gives you 8 PPM of dissolved O2, which is literally the most you can get from room air.

2. You always need priming sugar at bottling time (unless you bottle before fermentation is complete). Fermentation is complete because all available sugar (up to the yeast's tolerance level) has been processed. Adding priming sugar gives the yeast something else to eat, which they do to create the CO2 you need for carbonation.

Revvy has an excellent sticky on bottling - you should check it out.
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Old 12-04-2013, 05:17 AM   #329
joety
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homebrewdad
1. These days, I personally aerate with pure O2 for 60 seconds or so. If you don't have pure oxygen, simply slosh the beer back and forth in the fermenter for a minute or two. This gives you 8 PPM of dissolved O2, which is literally the most you can get from room air. 2. You always need priming sugar at bottling time (unless you bottle before fermentation is complete). Fermentation is complete because all available sugar (up to the yeast's tolerance level) has been processed. Adding priming sugar gives the yeast something else to eat, which they do to create the CO2 you need for carbonation. Revvy has an excellent sticky on bottling - you should check it out.
Yeah, I finally gave up on the little soldering o2 tanks and now have a regular cylinder of oxygen an a nice SS wand/stone. Love it!!! It has a regulator so I don't have to listen to know the flow rate.

I did this recipe recently and would make one change. Go for a mash temp of 154 vs 158 degrees. Mine finished a bit high. Still a great beer, though.
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Old 12-06-2013, 09:44 PM   #330
timcadieux
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AT_II View Post

1. When transferring from the brew pot to the fermenter, how do you typically aerate?
You could just leave your fermenter on the floor and transfer the wort by pouring it from high so it splashes alot.
With a carboy this requires some shaking if the carboy.
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