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Old 10-21-2010, 09:10 PM   #1
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Default caramelization chemistry

Does caramelization add non-fermentables to a brew? I know that caramelization doesn't really occur in the boil, but I was thinking of boiling down some wort to a thick syrup - something that I think is a traditional method for adding color - and body?

By doing this can I expect a higher FG? If so, any idea how much higher?


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Old 10-21-2010, 10:25 PM   #2
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Yes
Yes
Yes
No idea. It will depend on the amount and ratios.


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Old 10-21-2010, 10:35 PM   #3
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Man, I am glad this was asked as I have a related question. I'm not wanting a thick syrup or anything, but I also didn't want to use crystal malts in my brown. I know, I know, it would be easier, but it is a challenge I have taken on. I planned on toasting some of my pale ale malt and munich malt into amber and brown malts, but I was also debating a 1 gallon first runnings boil to caramelize some of the wort. My question was, will the chocolate malt I am using in the mash add a bad flavor if caramelized like this. At the brewery we used to do this small boil in our amber ale to get the flavor we wanted, but I am in unfamiliar territory with chocolate malt. I have never used chocolate malt ever!!! Very excited to try it out, but thought I'd ask opinions.

So, what would everyone do to make a good brown with only Pale ale, Munich, and chocolate 400L? Like I said, I have heard to toast some of the malts into amber malt and brown malt, but I am looking for more advice and ideas. If the chocolate sounds ok to caramelize via a small boil then great, but I am scared to just try it without some conversation.
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Old 10-22-2010, 12:07 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WortMonger View Post
Man, I am glad this was asked as I have a related question. I'm not wanting a thick syrup or anything, but I also didn't want to use crystal malts in my brown. I know, I know, it would be easier, but it is a challenge I have taken on. I planned on toasting some of my pale ale malt and munich malt into amber and brown malts, but I was also debating a 1 gallon first runnings boil to caramelize some of the wort. My question was, will the chocolate malt I am using in the mash add a bad flavor if caramelized like this. At the brewery we used to do this small boil in our amber ale to get the flavor we wanted, but I am in unfamiliar territory with chocolate malt. I have never used chocolate malt ever!!! Very excited to try it out, but thought I'd ask opinions.

So, what would everyone do to make a good brown with only Pale ale, Munich, and chocolate 400L? Like I said, I have heard to toast some of the malts into amber malt and brown malt, but I am looking for more advice and ideas. If the chocolate sounds ok to caramelize via a small boil then great, but I am scared to just try it without some conversation.
I'm hesitant to derail my own thread, but...

You could mash for 30 minutes without the chocolate malt, take a gallon or so of runnings and boil that up and then add the chocolate malt into the mash for the last 30 or so minutes. The chocolate doesn't need conversion anyways. Just a thought.
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Old 10-22-2010, 04:46 PM   #5
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I think you are right on with your suggestion, and sorry to jack your thread. The chocolate has a ppg of 29, so 30 minutes should be great to convert enough of the other malts to get a gallon to boil for caramelization.

Wish I knew something to tell you about FG on doing this, but all I know is it made a great amber ale at the brew pub.
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Old 10-22-2010, 05:04 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WortMonger View Post
I think you are right on with your suggestion, and sorry to jack your thread. The chocolate has a ppg of 29, so 30 minutes should be great to convert enough of the other malts to get a gallon to boil for caramelization.

Wish I knew something to tell you about FG on doing this, but all I know is it made a great amber ale at the brew pub.
no worries. How much did you reduce the collected wort? 50%? More?
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Old 10-22-2010, 05:54 PM   #7
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Actually, it was a tradition of firing up the kettle and just before the bottom turned red pumping in the sparge until the bottom was covered past the trub guard. One would think this would cause a sticky kettle bottom, but it always turned out fine. We tried it without once and everyone noticed.


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