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Old 10-11-2010, 09:22 PM   #1
nealperkins
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This I don't understand.

So, I had 10 gallons of Oatmeal Stout on beer gas. The first keg poured perfectly. [Note: I've learned to gas it up and disconnect the gas to avoid over gassing.]
But, keg #2 was over gassed by mistake...pours all foam and ugly. I began a process of degassing the beer . . . many times . . . still all foam. Finally, I've removed the keg to warm it us and really degas it.
So, what the heck is going on with this beer. Is there some sort of dynamic between the CO2 and Nitrogen that I don't understand?

Remedy?

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 09:41 PM   #2
mattd2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nealperkins View Post
[Note: I've learned to gas it up and disconnect the gas to avoid over gassing.]
from this I am guesing you are using the high PSI for ~2 days the down to serving after that?
A lot of people have had issues wth over carbing using this method, the set and forget method is much more reliable.

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 11:39 PM   #3
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Actually not. 35 PSI but for several days. Remember, this is beer gas.

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 11:49 PM   #4
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Why are you removing it from the gas? I was thinking the burst method would be something like 60-70 PSI when using beer gas
Reread you first post, it takes some time for the CO2 to gas out of the beer so do need to repurge many times to get things settled. What pressure are you serving at?

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 11:58 PM   #5
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Well, I'm not serving this keg at all.
My previous experience has been that - over time, think days/weeks - the beer seems to get more and more foamy. So, I am careful to get it up to serving pressure and then reconnect/disconnect the gas. When connected the gas is at 35 PSI.
I'm pissed because it has worked so well for so long. But, as stated, I left the gas connected for 2-4 weeks on keg #2 past what I needed.
* I'm wondering if the CO2 and/or the nitro comes out first. Anyway, I need to 'reset' this keg and bring it back.

 
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Old 10-12-2010, 12:26 AM   #6
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The nitro doesn't get absorbed into the beer, only the CO2. That is the reason for using beer gas, you can run higher PSI but not get overcarbing issues. You should still be able to set and forget and leave the gas hooked up (or some carb with CO2 to their set volume then switch over to beer gas to push), But I am having a hard time finding a beer gas carb chart most just say set it at 35 psi like you have.
What are the pours like compared to a stout from a pub? for me, most of the time at the pub the pour looks like 100% foam until it settles into beer/creamy head.

Hopefully that picture works, that one has settle a little. First up it all looks like the "middle" section.

 
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Old 10-12-2010, 11:25 AM   #7
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Oh yeah, when its right its a beautiful cascade. This one is ALL foam, as in the top of your beer. I'm going to finish degassing it today and then start over. It is completely warm today and should go quickly...well below a proper carb level. Thanks

 
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Old 10-12-2010, 02:16 PM   #8
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Quote:
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Oh yeah, when its right its a beautiful cascade. This one is ALL foam, as in the top of your beer. I'm going to finish degassing it today and then start over. It is completely warm today and should go quickly...well below a proper carb level. Thanks
Sounds like there is nothing wrong with your pressures. I also force-carb my stouts and use beer-gas at ~28-32PSI for serving. Sounds to me like the temperature of your keg is just too high. That alone has been the single most problematic issue I have whenever excessive foam is present - nitro beers or straight CO2 beers.

Are you absolutely sure that the keg was completely cooled before you pulled a pint from it?

 
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Old 10-12-2010, 02:39 PM   #9
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Actually, this beer was not force carbed and it was in the walk in fridge for 3 months. I just cleaned the dip tube...nothing there and am almost completely de-carbing the beer.

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Old 10-12-2010, 03:08 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nealperkins View Post
Actually, this beer was not force carbed and it was in the walk in fridge for 3 months. I just cleaned the dip tube...nothing there and am almost completely de-carbing the beer.

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Not force carbed? You are using corn-syrup or some other form of sugar to carbonate this?

If that is the case then make sure you only add enough to carb it to 1.0-1.5 volumes of CO2 - anymore will cause nothing but foam. Then after the yeast naturally carbonate the beer, attach your mixed blend at ~30PSI (adjust for temperature).

If you are simply force carbing, simply set your mixed blend to ~30PSI (depending on temperature) and forget it. In 2-3 weeks the pressure will be just right. There is no reason to ever take it off the gas unless somehow you don't have an accurate mix of gas (75%N/25%CO2).

Still sounds like either it is a temperature issue (too warm), or somehow this beer got over overcarbonated, and if it was not force carbed, then there was too much 'carb' sugar added.

Could there possibly be a leak/hole somewhere in your beer line? This will cause CRAZY foam! But assuming you used the exact same lines as the last keg, this is unlikely - but definately a good place to look.

Good Luck!

 
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