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Old 10-11-2010, 03:25 PM   #11
hal2814
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Jul 2009
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I've been pondering making more session beers myself lately. I'm leaning more light lager at this point but may also throw a mild in my recipe hopper.

Not to derail us completely, but I think part of the problem with micros and milds is that the ingredients are a small portion of the costs. It's hard for me to justify coughing up $10 for a 6-pack of mild when a style I like in a higher ABV carries almost the same cost. Whereas if I were to actually brew a mild vs. that other style, the cost would be significantly lower. For example, using washed yeast and bulk hops, it looks like my upcoming session lager is going to cost me about $20 for 10 gallons of beer. My dark lager I just brewed cost me about $30 for the same volume. That's a lot more palpable to me.

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 03:41 PM   #12
elkdog
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hal2814 View Post
I've been pondering making more session beers myself lately. I'm leaning more light lager at this point but may also throw a mild in my recipe hopper.

Not to derail us completely, but I think part of the problem with micros and milds is that the ingredients are a small portion of the costs. It's hard for me to justify coughing up $10 for a 6-pack of mild when a style I like in a higher ABV carries almost the same cost. Whereas if I were to actually brew a mild vs. that other style, the cost would be significantly lower. For example, using washed yeast and bulk hops, it looks like my upcoming session lager is going to cost me about $20 for 10 gallons of beer. My dark lager I just brewed cost me about $30 for the same volume. That's a lot more palpable to me.
I agree. That's why Milds, Ordinary Bitters, and Scottish Ales are such great beers to brew. Plus, Milds and OB's are ready to drink quite quickly, to boot. Sounds like a Mild would round out your lineup pretty nicely.
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Old 10-11-2010, 03:46 PM   #13
Hermit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkdog View Post
I agree. That's why Milds, Ordinary Bitters, and Scottish Ales are such great beers to brew. Plus, Milds and OB's are ready to drink quite quickly, to boot. Sounds like a Mild would round out your lineup pretty nicely.
Mild in the secondary to free up the primary. Was going to do an OB but decided on a Scottish Ale instead.

Maybe it is a result of my aging metabolism, but I'd rather not have as much alcohol on a daily basis.

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 03:50 PM   #14
david_42
 
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I've converted a few people to craft beers with my Milds. Took a Mild to the 2009 Septembeerfest and it was gone almost as soon as the IPA another guy brought.

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 04:20 PM   #15
ArcaneXor
 
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Mild is one of my favorite styles. I need to brew one again.

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 07:14 PM   #16
Frank the Tank
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I concur with all the mild-loving sentiments--a flavorful, light beer with a quick turnaround time. Last night, I tapped a keg of my second batch of this great "American mellow" (from DesJardin Brewing), with some minor modifications. I'm looking forward to playing around with this style!

bierhaus15 (or anyone else), what's a "historical" mild?
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Old 10-11-2010, 09:46 PM   #17
bierhaus15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob View Post
I'd rather enjoy four pints of Mild or Bitter and still have some taste buds than one IIPA and taste nothing but hops for the next 24-48 hours. I find a well-crafted low-OG "session" ale a wonderful thing, because I can drink it for hours and still A. get home safely, and B. taste my bangers and mash.
+ 1 to that!

It's good to see some people sticking up for the "little guys" of beer styles. It really irks me when I go to a beer tasting and some beer snob treats a beautiful pint of mild or bitter like a jagerbomb - downs it in one big gulp and moves on to the bigger styles without batting an eye. That, and I'm tired of always explaining a) what a mild/bitter is, and b) why it doesn't taste like like hop juice. I figure I can buy good commerical IPA's anywhere, but a REALLY good pint of Mild or Bitter is almost impossible to find.

Aside, when I meant 'historical mild' I meant a mild like those that would have been brewed a hundred years ago; which means a beer unlike any mild we have today - bitter, strong, hoppy.

Keep on brewing Mild!

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 09:49 PM   #18
ArcaneXor
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bierhaus15 View Post
Aside, when I meant 'historical mild' I meant a mild like those that would have been brewed a hundred years ago; which means a beer unlike any mild we have today - bitter, strong, hoppy.
And probably sour

 
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Old 10-11-2010, 10:41 PM   #19
Bob
 
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Not sour.

"Mild" in the historical sense means "fresh"; other terms were "present-use," or "running beer".

"Stock" ales were stored long enough to probably pick up some sourness. Porter, stout, Burton and India ales were stored in wood.

Roger Bergen wrote, in an article on Porter in Brewing Techniques magazine:

Quote:
Not only were these "mild" ales of "low" gravity -- in the 1.050s, circa 1900 -- they lacked the characteristic acidity of the Brettanomyces secondary fermentation.
Cheers,

Bob
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Old 10-11-2010, 11:01 PM   #20
ArcaneXor
 
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I stand corrected.

 
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