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Old 10-09-2010, 02:21 AM   #1
mdstrobe
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May 2010
Indianapolis
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So I was thinking...

In order to improve the flavor of my brew, I was thinking if this will do anything so let me know if the flavor will be better.

So when I bottle, after about 2 weeks (to ensure that carbonation is in there), I'm thinking about boiling a big pot of water and putting my bottles (with beer) in the boiling water for about 15 minutes to pasteurize them and then setting to chill.

Let me know if this will improve my beer?

 
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Old 10-09-2010, 02:40 AM   #2
Gregscsu
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Apr 2010
St. Paul
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NO.

Bottle conditioning is a bonus of home brewing. Your beer will continue to mature and improve in the bottle. It depends on the style but some beers are best within the first four weeks while others continue to improve over 12+ months.

Heating the crap out of your beer may make it more shelf stable in high temperature, but it is unecessary and will be detrimental to the flavor of your beer.
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Old 10-09-2010, 02:43 AM   #3
mdstrobe
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Am I completely off base here?? Don't commercial breweries 'pasteurize' their beers?

 
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Old 10-09-2010, 02:51 AM   #4
Gregscsu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdstrobe View Post
Am I completely off base here?? Don't commercial breweries 'pasteurize' their beers?
Commercial breweries pasteurize their beer to facilitate a longer shelf life, more stable, consistent product batch to batch, and combat the effects of poor storage and handling. ie. beer in the back of a 90F semi truck, Or being shipped cross country for three weeks to a distributer for two weeks, then a store for three weeks, and finally to the consuner for as long as it takes them to drink it.

Natural bottle conditioning is the way to go. Just follow proper storage and handling techniques and your beer will be just fine.
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Old 10-09-2010, 02:56 AM   #5
logan3825
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Sep 2010
Madison, Wisconsin
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Commercial beers also filter their beer through diatomaceous earth which pretty much strips away all the yeast and character of the beer in my opinion.

 
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