How to build a control panel (part 1) - Page 52 - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > How to build a control panel (part 1)

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-31-2012, 09:03 PM   #511
grupe
Recipes 
 
Oct 2011
Omaha, NE
Posts: 77
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


I got mine at auto zone or napa. I can't remember for sure.
__________________
-Graham

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 12:52 AM   #512
kal
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
kal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2006
Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,518
Liked 347 Times on 224 Posts


Any electronics shop. I think I got mine from the (now defunct) Radio Shack.

Kal

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2013, 06:19 PM   #513
Homercidal
Licensed Sensual Massage Therapist.
HBT_MODERATOR.png
 
Homercidal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2008
Reed City, MI
Posts: 30,691
Liked 4784 Times on 3225 Posts


Radio Shack defunct?? I went there the other day and they are still online. (Though a shadow of their former selves, I admit.)

Anyway, just wanted to come on here and give thanks for your information. I'm in process of designing the layout of my own control panel and your build thread is most appreciated! I'm going to use many of your examples in my own system.

My current plans are for:

50A main power
30A each HLT and BK (In case I want to do a double batch and run the HLT for the second batch concurrently with the boil from the first.)
Single Pump
PID for HLT
PWM for BK

I'm also considering attaching a small LCD monitor to the panel and stashing a small computer inside the brewstand with speakers for jams while I brew. That way I can control the tunes without having to walk across the garage like I do now. Just need to buy a cheap trackball so I don't have to mess with a mousing surface.

Some of the electrical parts are kind of expensive, but I really want some of them, like the twist lock plugs and whatnot. Already got a nice panel from work and stripped it out and ready for new parts to go in.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 10:52 PM   #514
JayMac
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
Guelph, Ontario
Posts: 271
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts


Hey Kal,

I was reading your guide, and I got a little confused. My system is going to be much different than yours, so I'm trying to figure out what is actually necessary.

I understand that you use a contactor after the main power switch because this way you can use a 120V key switch to complete the 240V circuit (the same reason an electric car uses one- the auxiliary systems can energize the main battery pack). However, in my system I'm going to be running a 120V, 1500W ULWD element, so I will be running my pump, electronics, and element of a dedicated 120V 15A receptacle (that's roughly 92% capacity, but I am lacking 20A breaker's in my main control box so I don't have much choice).

Here are my questions:
1. is a contactor required after the key switch if everything will be running at 120V? If so, why?

2. I see that you use contactors in conjunction with your SSRs. Is that necessary in the case of a RIMS system with just one element? I believe your reasoning is that even if I have my element switch off, the SSR still poses the threat of shocking me (I think that's what I read?). The addition of the contactor would of course prevents this entirely (right? haha).

3. I keep hearing that we are using SSR's because they have the ability to switch almost instantaneously. But in your design, you have a SSR and a contactor in series. Wouldn't that not only limit the speed of the response to the speed that the contactor switches (rate limiting step), but also force the contactor to switch faster than it's intended (whenever the PID says so instead of a couple times during the brew session).

Thanks,
Jay

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 11:52 PM   #515
kal
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
kal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2006
Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,518
Liked 347 Times on 224 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by JayMac View Post
1. is a contactor required after the key switch if everything will be running at 120V? If so, why?
If your main power switch can handle all the power you expect to put through the panel, no contactor or relay needed. Confirm the switch you want to use as many are only good to 10A.

Quote:
2. I see that you use contactors in conjunction with your SSRs. Is that necessary in the case of a RIMS system with just one element? I believe your reasoning is that even if I have my element switch off, the SSR still poses the threat of shocking me (I think that's what I read?). The addition of the contactor would of course prevents this entirely (right? haha).
Correct. Read the "How it works" section on this page:
http://www.theelectricbrewery.com/co...part-2?page=13

Quote:
3. I keep hearing that we are using SSR's because they have the ability to switch almost instantaneously. But in your design, you have a SSR and a contactor in series. Wouldn't that not only limit the speed of the response to the speed that the contactor switches (rate limiting step), but also force the contactor to switch faster than it's intended (whenever the PID says so instead of a couple times during the brew session).
SSRs are used because they're meant to be switched on/off a lot, often many times a second. A relay is not meant for that. See the "How it works" section again in previous link I posted. It explains it.

Kal

P-J Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 03:07 AM   #516
joety
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
joety's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2008
Germantown Wisconsin
Posts: 1,428
Liked 18 Times on 15 Posts


JayMac, I built the panel you describe, albeit for 20a. If you look at the pics, I have one in-line fuse for the lower amp stuff which allows me to use thinner guage wire, and one for the higher amp stuff (the fuse box). I did use a contactor for the main power as well as the SSR. I think you're a little confused and not sure if Kal's response will make sense to you. The contactor for the SSR is wired to be turned on/off from a switch on the panel so you can cut power to the heating element without shutting off the whole panel. When you start brewing you'll understand why this is helpful. It is not used to turn on/off the heating element to control the temp, that's what the SSR is for. When the contactor is off, the PID will attempt to fire the SSR (and thus the element) and no power will actually go through the element. When it's on its like it doesn't exist. The PID will fire the SSR and element rapidly as it tries to control the temp.

I hope this helps. I wish I had a good schematic of my setup but I can't even find my rough drawings and after looking at Kal's first rate diagrams they would not impress.
Click image for larger version

Name:	Panel 1.jpg
Views:	320
Size:	54.1 KB
ID:	112646   Click image for larger version

Name:	Panel 2.jpg
Views:	323
Size:	46.2 KB
ID:	112647   Click image for larger version

Name:	Panel 3.jpg
Views:	336
Size:	66.1 KB
ID:	112648  
__________________
Conical 1 - Empty
Conical 2 - Empty
Carboys - None

Secondaries - None
Lagering in Kegs - None

Kegged: Afterburner Cream Ale, 70/70 IPA, Golden Oat Stout, BLC
Bottled: Oaked Bourbon Porter
Planned: Looking for ideas

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 09:02 PM   #517
kal
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
kal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2006
Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,518
Liked 347 Times on 224 Posts


Fast forward to today: The control panel is still working great - I brewed batch #157 last week in my new brewing room where it now sits.

I painted the back panel that is used to hang it on the wall a darker grey colour to better match the wall tile (no more darkbrown/rust colours):







Kal

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 09:15 PM   #518
Tiber_Brew
It's about the beer.
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Tiber_Brew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2010
Upper Peninsula, Michigan
Posts: 2,411
Liked 208 Times on 146 Posts


Looks great, bud! How's the beer flowing?
__________________
On tap:
1. Imperial Oatmeal Espresso Stout 2. Michigan IPL 3. Kölsch 4. Kentucky Common 5.[Nitrogen] Oat Blonde
Primary:
1. none 2. none 3. none 4. none 5. none 6. none
Secondary:
1. Brett Ale 2. none 3. none 4. none 5. none
Bottled:
About 23 gallons of beer & 3 gallons of mead
Kegged & conditioning:
Rye Barrel aged DIPA, Altbier, Helles x2, Kentucky Common

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 09:20 PM   #519
kal
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
kal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2006
Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,518
Liked 347 Times on 224 Posts


The beer is flowing very nicely! Thanks for asking!

Kal

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2013, 10:32 PM   #520
Tiber_Brew
It's about the beer.
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Tiber_Brew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2010
Upper Peninsula, Michigan
Posts: 2,411
Liked 208 Times on 146 Posts


By the way, I dig the apron. I didn't quite picture you in Carhartt overalls and swampers, but I figured you'd have some sort of brewing garb.
__________________
On tap:
1. Imperial Oatmeal Espresso Stout 2. Michigan IPL 3. Kölsch 4. Kentucky Common 5.[Nitrogen] Oat Blonde
Primary:
1. none 2. none 3. none 4. none 5. none 6. none
Secondary:
1. Brett Ale 2. none 3. none 4. none 5. none
Bottled:
About 23 gallons of beer & 3 gallons of mead
Kegged & conditioning:
Rye Barrel aged DIPA, Altbier, Helles x2, Kentucky Common

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Electric brewery build nostalgia Electric Brewing 200 12-29-2015 02:22 AM
240VAC Toolbox Control Panel with Pics passedpawn Electric Brewing 104 01-05-2012 04:15 AM
The Graham Box Control Unit from more beer killian Electric Brewing 3 12-03-2010 06:23 AM


Forum Jump