Molasses - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Molasses

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-01-2010, 07:18 PM   #1
kunstler
Recipes 
 
Feb 2009
Posts: 181
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts



I've done a quick search and I've seen many people brew/prime with molasses and I have a general idea on how much I want to start with, but someone mentioned in one of those year old threads about different grades.

Fine, cooking, and blackstrap.

I guess fine has less impurities and more sugar content thus sweeter and then blackstrap is far more bitter and "what's left" after sugar processing

So if that is all true, wouldn't blackstrap be more fitting for imparting a molasses flavor to your beer than the other two grades as in those the sugars would be fermenting out....

Does my logic make sense? Or will the fine grade leave a sweeter beer with flavor vs bitter with flavor.

I'm trying to see if I should account for sweetness and or extra fermentables

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2010, 07:25 PM   #2
jgln
Recipes 
 
May 2008
Southern, NJ
Posts: 3,486
Liked 54 Times on 42 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by kunstler View Post
I've done a quick search and I've seen many people brew/prime with molasses and I have a general idea on how much I want to start with, but someone mentioned in one of those year old threads about different grades.

Fine, cooking, and blackstrap.

I guess fine has less impurities and more sugar content thus sweeter and then blackstrap is far more bitter and "what's left" after sugar processing

So if that is all true, wouldn't blackstrap be more fitting for imparting a molasses flavor to your beer than the other two grades as in those the sugars would be fermenting out....

Does my logic make sense? Or will the fine grade leave a sweeter beer with flavor vs bitter with flavor.

I'm trying to see if I should account for sweetness and or extra fermentables
I made a 100% molasses beer a few years ago and it came out fairly nasty. I am not sure what grade I used though, it was called Grandma's or something and came in about 10oz glass jars. Put it this way, I still have quite a few bottles from that 5gal batch. Maybe I will chill and crack one open tonight to see if it got better but I doubt it. People told me not to but I had to prove it to myself so I say go for it.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2010, 07:29 PM   #3
jmo88
 
jmo88's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Sep 2008
Seattle
Posts: 1,380
Liked 25 Times on 16 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jgln View Post
I made a 100% molasses beer a few years ago and it came out fairly nasty. I am not sure what grade I used though, it was called Grandma's or something and came in about 10oz glass jars. Put it this way, I still have quite a few bottles from that 5gal batch. Maybe I will chill and crack one open tonight to see if it got better but I doubt it. People told me not to but I had to prove it to myself so I say go for it.
100% molasses You are brave. How much did you use?
__________________
(~):} Just a little Furthur (~):}

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2010, 07:32 PM   #4
jgln
Recipes 
 
May 2008
Southern, NJ
Posts: 3,486
Liked 54 Times on 42 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jmo88 View Post
100% molasses You are brave. How much did you use?
I don't remember, I think I just bought a bunch of jars and added to the boiling water until I got a SG for about a 4% ABV beer.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2010, 07:36 PM   #5
kunstler
Recipes 
 
Feb 2009
Posts: 181
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts


Well I'm going to add it to a pre-existing recipe not straigt not looking to make rum. But I'm not sure if blackstrap will end up being sweeter than fine or cooking in the end or just taste burnt

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2010, 07:45 PM   #6
jgln
Recipes 
 
May 2008
Southern, NJ
Posts: 3,486
Liked 54 Times on 42 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by kunstler View Post
Well I'm going to add it to a pre-existing recipe not straigt not looking to make rum. But I'm not sure if blackstrap will end up being sweeter than fine or cooking in the end or just taste burnt
It has been said and I have read that George Washington made a beer of just molasses and hops so I wanted to try it. It would only be a step toward making run if you upped the ABV and then you would still need to distill.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2010, 07:53 PM   #7
dirty_martini
Recipes 
 
May 2010
Los Angeles
Posts: 320
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts


dont use blackstrap. seems every time I tried using that I got a weird iron note as well as an off-licorice flavor. something about fermented blackstrap just isnt appealing.

however, just using plain unsulphured original molasses will get you what you want. also, if you can find Sucanat, it is unrefined sugar with its full molasses content unlike turbinado, which only has trace amounts of the molasses

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2010, 07:55 PM   #8
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2007
"Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,921
Liked 3198 Times on 1886 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by kunstler View Post

I guess fine has less impurities and more sugar content thus sweeter and then blackstrap is far more bitter and "what's left" after sugar processing

So if that is all true, wouldn't blackstrap be more fitting for imparting a molasses flavor to your beer than the other two grades as in those the sugars would be fermenting out....

I'm trying to see if I should account for sweetness and or extra fermentables
I've only ever used blackstap in my beers, mostly in my version of poor richard's ale, and that was no more than iirc a half cup in a batch. I've also added some of it to light brown sugar to make a "rawer" sugar as a brewing adjunct, because just as you say, the less refined the sugar, the more "flavor" you get. Because it is the unfermentables that give it the dark color and flavor. After they yeast eats the sugars in it, it is that stuff that is left behind.

I've never used any higher grades of it, but I have used other darker, rougher things like that, like 50 year old honey that is really black, and full of "dark" flavors. This is it;



It's amazingly flavorful stuff. We also made a gallon of mead with the remaining amount after my barleywine.
__________________
Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2010, 08:02 PM   #9
GaryJohn
 
GaryJohn's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2010
chicago
Posts: 228
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts


I've used blackstrap in a stout, and a barelywine. It definately adds some rich flavor, and it can be a good thing. It's not really sweet (cuz the sugar ferments) but it is molasses flavor, kind of burnt I guess. Hard to describe.

The different grades of molasses will add different amount of "molasses" flavor, but they will also add different types of molasses flavor. It's not just a more/less thing if you add light/dark molasses. It's more of a "different" thing in terms of flavor.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2010, 08:03 PM   #10
jgln
Recipes 
 
May 2008
Southern, NJ
Posts: 3,486
Liked 54 Times on 42 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
I've only ever used blackstap in my beers, mostly in my version of poor richard's ale, and that was no more than iirc a half cup in a batch. I've also added some of it to light brown sugar to make a "rawer" sugar as a brewing adjunct, because just as you say, the less refined the sugar, the more "flavor" you get. Because it is the unfermentables that give it the dark color and flavor. After they yeast eats the sugars in it, it is that stuff that is left behind.

I've never used any higher grades of it, but I have used other darker, rougher things like that, like 50 year old honey that is really black, and full of "dark" flavors. This is it;



It's amazingly flavorful stuff. We also made a gallon of mead with the remaining amount after my barleywine.

Wow, that is one "heavy" beer!


I know, I know, that is the honey not the beer.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Molasses Rivercat96 Recipes/Ingredients 13 08-16-2012 08:28 PM
Molasses Question tigerface Recipes/Ingredients 2 05-22-2010 02:44 PM
Using molasses dutch101st Recipes/Ingredients 8 04-08-2009 02:55 PM
Sorghum or Molasses???? RevRon Recipes/Ingredients 7 11-26-2008 05:17 PM
Molasses Anyone? jaymack Recipes/Ingredients 2 08-23-2005 12:49 AM


Forum Jump