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Old 09-13-2012, 11:46 AM   #481
ajdelange
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Yes, that is indeed a valid approach to getting a rough idea as to what effects the stylistic ions (sulfate, chloride, sodium and let's include magnesium here even though it also has an effect on pH). I never would have thought that this would work and, other than table salt, I have never tried it but Colin Kaminsky (Downtown Joe's in Napa) tunes his salt additions by this method.

 
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Old 09-19-2012, 05:30 PM   #482
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Hello,
I was going to make some of Bell's two hearted ipa and wanted to make sure i understand this.......for 5 gallons of water i would add 4tsp calcium and 2tsp gypsum?

 
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Old 09-19-2012, 06:07 PM   #483
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pfowl01
Hello,
I was going to make some of Bell's two hearted ipa and wanted to make sure i understand this.......for 5 gallons of water i would add 4tsp calcium and 2tsp gypsum?
I think the recommendation is actually to add 2 tsp of each (for "minerally" beers). I would consider just starting with 1 tsp of each, and possibly increasing the additions in subsequent batches of the same brew if you feel like you want more minerals. My sense is it's easy to OVER-adjust your water, so it's better to start with the minimum amount to keep your mash pH in a good range and then experiment with adding more (even using small additions to the finished beer) to see if you feel like more mineral content improves the beer.

Disclaimer: I'm just starting to study water chemistry. Hopefully someone with more experience will correct me if I'm wrong.

 
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Old 09-19-2012, 08:31 PM   #484
ajdelange
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1 tsp of gypsum and 1 of calcium chloride would be a good place to start. Add or detract from that in subsequent batches until you hit the levels that give you the most pleasing beer.

 
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Old 09-19-2012, 08:58 PM   #485
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Sounds good I'll try that.....thanks guys

 
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Old 09-22-2012, 09:16 PM   #486
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Thanks for an educational thread Yooper and AJ. That PH meter better be under the Christmas tree this year!

After using water softenener water for a few AG brews, I have finally decided to learn this water chemsitry stuff. I am not a scientist, so i have some questions.

Would you add gypsum to a hoppy red ale as if it were an IPA? Specifically Jamil's Evil Twin recipe?
I will be using 100% RO water and following the baseline additions for calcium and acidulated malt.

Do higher gravity brews like barleywines need "more" additions or does gravity not matter when it comes to water chemistry?

When using 100% RO in water profile spreadsheets, are all your starting mineral numbers "0"? Does RO remove everything?
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Old 09-22-2012, 09:38 PM   #487
ajdelange
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewsncrabs View Post
Would you add gypsum to a hoppy red ale as if it were an IPA? Specifically Jamil's Evil Twin recipe?
You'd have to ask Jamill about that! Actually it depends on personal taste. I always suggest starting low on gypsum and working up.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewsncrabs View Post
Do higher gravity brews like barleywines need "more" additions or does gravity not matter when it comes to water chemistry?
It depends on the requirements of the style more than the gravity.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewsncrabs View Post
When using 100% RO in water profile spreadsheets, are all your starting mineral numbers "0"? Does RO remove everything?
Yes. The actual numbers aren't 0 but they are pretty close. If you wanted to use actual numbers you would have to do an analysis on the RO water each time you brewed. 0 is close enough.

 
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Old 09-22-2012, 10:17 PM   #488
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Thanks for the quick response. You have made this easier to understand. Cant wait to try it tomorrow morning!
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Old 10-27-2012, 05:24 PM   #489
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So, we've got two beer under our belt using this guide and all of your help, starting off with deionized water. They turned out fantastic, thanks!

I've run into a bit of a snag tho, we are attempting our 3rd pure water brew, a caramel cream ale that we loved, and this is the first time that the EZ water calculator puts us UNDER in our PH

This is for an 11.5 gallon finished batch, using 7.5g mash and 9.1 gallon sparge

15.5lbs 2row
6.5lbs wheat malt
3.5 Crystal 60L

The estimated mash output is @ 5.36..... so I need to raise it for the first time. Not sure if I should follow the guide and still add the calc chloride first to make it go even further into the negative AND THEN add slaked lime/baking soda to raise it? Or to just add the slaked lime/baking soda only? Or to leave it alone?

I'm hesitant to cut the deionized water with tap water because I don't know it's profile, and it changes upwards to 4 times a year.

halp?

THANKS

 
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Old 10-27-2012, 05:56 PM   #490
ajdelange
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This is the Primer thread where the philosophy is that you don't worry about what spreadsheets or calculators tell you - you just brew the beer using common sense, simple additions. It doesn't guarantee success every time - just probable success. OTOH if you use the EZ (or other) spreadsheet and it tells you that you are going to get a mash pH of 5.36 your mash pH could be anywhere from 5.16 to 5.56 as the spreadsheet doesn't know the parameters of the actual malt you are using. In other words Primer or spreadsheet there is uncertainty as to what the actual outcome will be. The only way to resolve that uncertainty is to obtain and use a pH meter and that is really what I recommend everyone do.

I don't know what the 'ideal' mash pH is (if there is one) but my inclination is that it is around 5.4. If I measured 5.36 in a mash I would not worry. I would probably use a bit less acid next time though.

 
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