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Old 06-20-2011, 09:24 PM   #121
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saccharomyces

Certainly. I know plenty of folks who have had good success with the sauermalz, but I prefer acid since I don't know the % acid content of my malt and it doesn't store well (for some reason acidulated malt seems to attract weevils at my house).
Kal's method of using 5- or 6-gal buckets and using Gamma Seal Lids to make them nice and airtight is a pretty surefire way of keeping bugs out. Bulk grains get poured directly into the buckets, specialty grains go in labeled Ziplocs, stored in identical buckets.

Edit: after seeing the ajdelange's post, I should add we're talking about almost the same thing. Gamma Seal Lids are standalone versions of the lids that make Vittles Vaults so useful, but IMO are much more cost-effective.

 
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Old 06-20-2011, 10:58 PM   #122
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Any way to determine how much calcium is stripped from using phosphoric acid? I want to experiment with dropping my strike/sparge water down with it. My water has low everything, and I usually only add calcium chloride and sometimes gypsum, along with lactic acid or sauermalz to get to the proper ph. I usually just shoot for 50ppm on the calcium.

My thinking is if I use the phosphoric acid, my only mash/boil addition would be calcium chloride, thus simplifying the whole process.

 
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Old 06-21-2011, 01:41 AM   #123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emjay View Post
It can be. They're both used simply for pH adjustments... not sure what you're having an issue with.

No issues, just considering p-acid instead the sm.
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Old 06-21-2011, 02:38 PM   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwest450 View Post
Any way to determine how much calcium is stripped from using phosphoric acid? I want to experiment with dropping my strike/sparge water down with it. My water has low everything, and I usually only add calcium chloride and sometimes gypsum, along with lactic acid or sauermalz to get to the proper ph. I usually just shoot for 50ppm on the calcium.

My thinking is if I use the phosphoric acid, my only mash/boil addition would be calcium chloride, thus simplifying the whole process.
bump.

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Old 06-21-2011, 03:08 PM   #125
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Interested in an answer to Wildwest's question and while we're on the topic of Phosphoric acid (and esp regarding the claim that it is 'flavor neutral'), the stuff we use at work stinks to high heaven. Does the stuff used for brewing stink? Or is the question more of whether the phosphate ion is flavor/aroma neutral?
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:37 PM   #126
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpanishCastleAle
Interested in an answer to Wildwest's question and while we're on the topic of Phosphoric acid (and esp regarding the claim that it is 'flavor neutral'), the stuff we use at work stinks to high heaven. Does the stuff used for brewing stink? Or is the question more of whether the phosphate ion is flavor/aroma neutral?
Star San is mostly phosphoric acid. Phosphoric acid is also used in many sodas (in pretty high amounts), and I've even seen it in flavored waters. In higher concentrations it contributes an acidic bite, but as far as actual flavor/aroma goes, there's pretty much none to speak of... and definitely not with the relatively low concentrations resulting from simple mash pH adjustment.

 
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:50 PM   #127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpanishCastleAle View Post
Interested in an answer to Wildwest's question and while we're on the topic of Phosphoric acid (and esp regarding the claim that it is 'flavor neutral'), the stuff we use at work stinks to high heaven. Does the stuff used for brewing stink? Or is the question more of whether the phosphate ion is flavor/aroma neutral?
The stuff I got is only 10%, no discernible odor.

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Old 06-21-2011, 04:51 PM   #128
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwest450 View Post
Any way to determine how much calcium is stripped from using phosphoric acid? I want to experiment with dropping my strike/sparge water down with it. My water has low everything, and I usually only add calcium chloride and sometimes gypsum, along with lactic acid or sauermalz to get to the proper ph. I usually just shoot for 50ppm on the calcium.

My thinking is if I use the phosphoric acid, my only mash/boil addition would be calcium chloride, thus simplifying the whole process.
bump again, no one's going to see this if you guy's keep commenting.

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Old 06-21-2011, 04:58 PM   #129
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Thanks emjay. I did not know it was used in flavored waters.
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Old 06-21-2011, 05:03 PM   #130
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwest450 View Post
Any way to determine how much calcium is stripped from using phosphoric acid? I want to experiment with dropping my strike/sparge water down with it. My water has low everything, and I usually only add calcium chloride and sometimes gypsum, along with lactic acid or sauermalz to get to the proper ph. I usually just shoot for 50ppm on the calcium.

My thinking is if I use the phosphoric acid, my only mash/boil addition would be calcium chloride, thus simplifying the whole process.
I'll be shutting up now WW. Oh but lemme add this; I thought I had read that there is a bunch of phosphate in malt, so much that it dwarfs any amount we might be adding by pH adjustment with phosphoric acid. So adding a bit of phosphoric shouldn't affect the Calcium content much.
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