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Old 09-13-2010, 12:00 AM   #1
jcav
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Hello everyone, I am building my Brutus style stand and I am using the Honeywell pilot valves, and the big 10 inch low pressure Banjo burners. The distance between the bottom of the burner and the Honeywell valve on the gas piping is probably going to be around 7 inches away from each other. Does anyone know how hot the Banjo's get under the burner and if they throw a lot of heat downward? I will be using needle valves to control the flame height on both the MLT and HLT burners, so they more than likely will not be full throttle open.

If anyone has the same kind of setup with Banjos and pilot valves, do I need to put a heat shield between the bottom of the burner and the Honeywell valve? Or is 7 inches away not a problem with the heat interfearing with the valve? Any feedback is appreciated.

John


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Old 09-13-2010, 08:37 PM   #2
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I know Kevin (Kladue) is gonna get tired of me referring this stuff to him he is the man on these honeywell valves and what not. But here is my rig. No explosions YET




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Old 09-13-2010, 10:01 PM   #3
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Wow nice rig!!! You did an excellent job. Thanks for answering Simphoto, this will help me out a lot. I see you have no problem with the valves being close to the burners. I am happy you did not blow yourself up

Thanks again,

John
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Old 09-13-2010, 11:55 PM   #4
Fletch
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I've been running one under the HLT on two different rigs, my home sanke based and Club 1 barrel sized, for 8 and 5 years, respectively. No problems due to heat, but it IS a good idea to protect them from water, overflows, boilovers, etc. Also, it's a good idea to put a drip leg in the piping between the burner and the Honeywell valve. This would consist of a simple tee in the line, with the perpendicular part pointing down, with a short lenght of tube or pipe, and either a cap or shutoff cock. Condensation (and/or water raining down on the burner) will then fall down into the drip leg, instead of flooding - and ruining - your auto valve. You can guess why I know this...

 
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Old 09-14-2010, 01:33 AM   #5
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Try to keep the Honeywell to the side of the burner if possible and low enough that the hot gasses will not be hitting it as they escape the keg skirt and frame. A modification of the keg skirt that will greatly improve performance is to make 4 to 5 1-1/2" holes in the skirt between the rolled rim and the weld, this lets the hot gasses out and lets the flame run across the bottom. Placing the holes in an area away from the plumbing on the back side of the keg makes standing next to and stirring much cooler. If you are into fabrication you could make exhaust boots like I did and vent most of the hot gasses away from the brewing area. If you want to see how it was done I have a couple pictures showing the burner in action and the exhaust boot for the newer system.

 
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Old 09-15-2010, 01:07 AM   #6
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Good idea Fletch. I did see the drip leg diagram in the installation instructions that came with the Honeywell valve. I have not seen anyone utilize this in their builds yet so I did not know if this was only for a when the valve is used to control a furnace, as they are designed to control. I have not put the plumbing together yet and I think I will take your advice and go ahead and incorporate the drip leg in the plumbing. You probably saved me from a future valve problem.

Thanks for your reply!

John

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletch View Post
I've been running one under the HLT on two different rigs, my home sanke based and Club 1 barrel sized, for 8 and 5 years, respectively. No problems due to heat, but it IS a good idea to protect them from water, overflows, boilovers, etc. Also, it's a good idea to put a drip leg in the piping between the burner and the Honeywell valve. This would consist of a simple tee in the line, with the perpendicular part pointing down, with a short lenght of tube or pipe, and either a cap or shutoff cock. Condensation (and/or water raining down on the burner) will then fall down into the drip leg, instead of flooding - and ruining - your auto valve. You can guess why I know this...
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Old 09-15-2010, 01:11 AM   #7
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Thanks Kladue, I will look in your gallery to see how you made the exhaust boots. If it is not there maybe you can send me a link.

Thanks again!

John

Quote:
Originally Posted by kladue View Post
Try to keep the Honeywell to the side of the burner if possible and low enough that the hot gasses will not be hitting it as they escape the keg skirt and frame. A modification of the keg skirt that will greatly improve performance is to make 4 to 5 1-1/2" holes in the skirt between the rolled rim and the weld, this lets the hot gasses out and lets the flame run across the bottom. Placing the holes in an area away from the plumbing on the back side of the keg makes standing next to and stirring much cooler. If you are into fabrication you could make exhaust boots like I did and vent most of the hot gasses away from the brewing area. If you want to see how it was done I have a couple pictures showing the burner in action and the exhaust boot for the newer system.
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Old 10-02-2010, 12:18 AM   #8
EFaden
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Anyone have a parts list and wiring diagram for this? I have been looking to PID control a Propane HLT for a while. Also is this rig HP or LP?

 
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Old 10-03-2010, 02:14 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EFaden View Post
Anyone have a parts list and wiring diagram for this? I have been looking to PID control a Propane HLT for a while. Also is this rig HP or LP?
The systems using Honeywell valves use low pressure propane or natural gas as the valves can only handle low pressure propane at 1/2 psi of pressure. I am going this route using the Honeywell valves, with pilot light and thermocouple heat sensor for safety, and a low pressure regulator on a 20 lb. propane tank to convert the gas to low pressure. Of course I have to use low pressure burners also. If this is what you mean I can get you a part list. Many people go the high pressure propane route and use high pressure burners. Hopefully one of the members using high pressure can chime in with their advice with high pressure systems. There are some excellent threads I can dig up for you on wiring, gas control (gas control for dummies is one of them) etc. if you want.
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Old 10-03-2010, 12:27 PM   #10
EFaden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcav View Post
The systems using Honeywell valves use low pressure propane or natural gas as the valves can only handle low pressure propane at 1/2 psi of pressure. I am going this route using the Honeywell valves, with pilot light and thermocouple heat sensor for safety, and a low pressure regulator on a 20 lb. propane tank to convert the gas to low pressure. Of course I have to use low pressure burners also. If this is what you mean I can get you a part list. Many people go the high pressure propane route and use high pressure burners. Hopefully one of the members using high pressure can chime in with their advice with high pressure systems. There are some excellent threads I can dig up for you on wiring, gas control (gas control for dummies is one of them) etc. if you want.
Thanks. I found a couple of the threads. I think I was/am still confused about the comparison between HP and LP propane.



 
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