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Old 09-12-2010, 08:06 PM   #1
cinderbike
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Sep 2010
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I've been reading through most of the posts on here I could find regarding yeast strains for cider. However it seems like quite a few people are cold crashing.

Is it not recommended to just bottle ferment to 5-7% ABV? Are there even any yeasts that will work with cider and be able to do that?

I'm looking to make a drier cider that doesn't taste like white wine, but I don't have the equipment to forcecarb, so if anyone can help me by suggesting a good yeast that doesn't require cold crashing or backsweetening, I'd appreciate it.

 
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Old 09-12-2010, 09:06 PM   #2
doulovebeef
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Mar 2010
wichita, KS
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i dont make much cider, but wyeast has a strain specifically for ciders.. and cold crashing helps improve brilliance.

 
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Old 09-13-2010, 07:00 AM   #3
manticle
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Feb 2010
Melbourne, AU
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No yeast requires cold crashing (unless you are trying to get a sweeter cider and are cold crashing and racking multiple times - a practice I'm dubious about). I find it makes clearer, tastier cider quicker so I prefer to do it but it's not necessary.

 
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Old 09-13-2010, 09:49 PM   #4

Cinder -Would you clarify your question? Are you asking if there are yeasts that will stop working at a certain point, like beer, leaving some sweetness and making it possible go bottle condition them? Or ? Tell us where you want to end up (for example, semi-dry sparkling cider with some natural sweetness and bottle conditioned/carbed) and someone can help you figure out how to make it

 
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Old 09-14-2010, 05:12 PM   #5
cinderbike
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Sep 2010
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I'm looking at making a dry cider that I can bottle condition/carbonate. A little residual sugar would be okay, but I'm not a big fan of sweet ciders.

I'd like to try making a semi-dry though, so perhaps a batch of each?


 
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Old 09-15-2010, 10:31 AM   #6
Kauai_Kahuna
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May 2008
Hawaii
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The problem with semi-sweet, bottle carbonated ciders is that the yeast can continue fermenting to very dry and result in over carbonated drinks, or worst case dangerous bottle grenades.
One option that people have used is heat pasteurization once the desired carbonation is completed and sweetness level. I have not tried it, but it is basically heating up a large pot to around 160F, and then placing the bottles in for around 10 to 15 minutes, then removing the bottles and letting cool. There are threads here that describe it, but a search fails me right now.

Edit: OK, it's a sticky at the top of this cider forum, its 190F, and well just read that thread. I need to get some sleep.
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In Primary: Belgium Chimay clones.
In Secondary: Braggot, pale ale, end of the world white.
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