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Old 09-02-2010, 06:03 PM   #1
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Default Bottle conditioning a trippel, which yeast

I have a very strong trippel OG 1.10 FG 1.010 originally fermented with the Wyeast trappist high gravity that I want to bottle condition. I have racked it off the primary after a month. So now I plan to use some fresh yeast and unfermented wort to condition. What would be my best choice for yeast?
a) the original trappist high gravity b) Cal ale, or c) WLP 007 English dry.
I'm going to add an active starter at high Krausen.


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Old 09-02-2010, 06:15 PM   #2
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What's the ABV? I'd recommend using the same yeast that's in suspension, if you give it some more sugar it should condition just fine.


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Old 09-02-2010, 06:18 PM   #3
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After only a month, and with such a nice strong performing yeast, there is really no need to add any more yeast to it. I've used the high grav yeast and never needed to add any fresh yeast. Just scrape your autosiphon along the bottom of the primary once or twice to kick up and rack over that nice yeast and you'll be fine.
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Old 09-03-2010, 01:05 AM   #4
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I agree with Revvy; no need to add more yeast to your batch when you have one actively fermenting already.
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Old 09-03-2010, 01:14 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
After only a month, and with such a nice strong performing yeast, there is really no need to add any more yeast to it. I've used the high grav yeast and never needed to add any fresh yeast. Just scrape your autosiphon along the bottom of the primary once or twice to kick up and rack over that nice yeast and you'll be fine.
True. A lot of Belgian breweries blend yeast or use a different yeast for bottle conditioning, so although adding more isn't necessary, you could try using a different one.
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Old 09-03-2010, 11:03 PM   #6
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I've read that bottle conditioning with additional yeast can lead to bottle bombs unless you're kegging or using Champagne bottles and/or the heavier bottles that commercial breweries use for Belgian ales. Anyone actually use additional yeast for bottle conditioning w/o corking?
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Old 09-03-2010, 11:36 PM   #7
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I've read that bottle conditioning with additional yeast can lead to bottle bombs unless you're kegging or using Champagne bottles and/or the heavier bottles that commercial breweries use for Belgian ales. Anyone actually use additional yeast for bottle conditioning w/o corking?
That doesn't really make any sense. Bottle bombs come from too much sugar in the beer at bottling time which gets fermented in the pressurized environment.

Adding additional yeast isn't going to contribute to bottle bombs (unless of course there's too much sugar present and no yeast, which is not likely).
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Old 09-03-2010, 11:49 PM   #8
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That doesn't really make any sense. Bottle bombs come from too much sugar in the beer at bottling time which gets fermented in the pressurized environment.

Adding additional yeast isn't going to contribute to bottle bombs (unless of course there's too much sugar present and no yeast, which is not likely).
What can I say, I read it on a 10-year-old article

Just needed a sanity check.

I was thinking of experimenting with bottling some of my dubbel with extra yeast (since it's in a secondary right now) and let it hang out for a while (6+ months) to see what it does. I do have some 22 oz. bottles and oxygen absorbing caps I was going to use for the experiment.
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Old 09-04-2010, 12:19 AM   #9
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I would add a pinch of any clean yeast to the bottling bucket. rehydrate it first to make sure it doesn't float. There is no downside to doing so, but without it you just might not have carbonation. That's very high ABV and the existing yeast might be kaput. I did experience a very similar situation with a barleywine that didn't carbonate.

S-05 would be fine.


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