What is the life span of my home brew? - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > What is the life span of my home brew?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-11-2007, 02:53 PM   #1
BrooZer
Recipes 
 
Jan 2007
Posts: 340


As long as I dont drink it all, how long is the life span of my homebrew. What are the different maturity timeframes for different types (i.e., stouts, IPA, etc.). When does each type reach its peak??

Ive ordered the book "How to Brew" but have not gotten it yet and dont know if this is addressed.
__________________
Life, Liberty, And The Pursuit of Hoppyness

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2007, 02:58 PM   #2
david_42
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2005
Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,597
Liked 155 Times on 145 Posts


Way too many variables here. Roughly, a 4% ABV ale will peak 2-4 months, a 10% 12-18 months. Highly hopped ales lose their nose 4-6 months, that's why very high gravity ales tend to have malty profiles. Storage temperature is the most important consideration.
__________________
Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2007, 03:00 PM   #3
cweston
 
cweston's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2006
Manhattan, KS
Posts: 2,014
Liked 18 Times on 11 Posts


Most average-strength beers (gravities in the 40s-60s) Probably peak somewhere around 3 months after brew day (assuming decent storage conditions at something like "cellar temperatures.") A bit longer on the higher end of the gravity scale.

For beers with a very high hop flavor and aroma, like IPAs, some prefer to drink them wen fairly fresh because the hops flavor and aroma does tend to fade over time.

Beers with spices in them sometimes need a little extra time for the spice to mellow.

Over time, a beer becomes less hoppy tasting and sweeter, toasted and/or carmelly flavors develop.

Smaller beers reach their peak sooner and are really meant to be drunk fresh.
__________________

Primary: none
Secondary:
Bottle conditioning: Robust Porter
Drinking: Saison Dupont clone, tripel
Coming soon: Columbus APA, Rich Red ale

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2007, 04:02 PM   #4
BrooZer
Recipes 
 
Jan 2007
Posts: 340

Quote:
Originally Posted by cweston
Most average-strength beers (gravities in the 40s-60s) Probably peak somewhere around 3 months after brew day (assuming decent storage conditions at something like "cellar temperatures.") A bit longer on the higher end of the gravity scale.

For beers with a very high hop flavor and aroma, like IPAs, some prefer to drink them wen fairly fresh because the hops flavor and aroma does tend to fade over time.

Beers with spices in them sometimes need a little extra time for the spice to mellow.

Over time, a beer becomes less hoppy tasting and sweeter, toasted and/or carmelly flavors develop.

Smaller beers reach their peak sooner and are really meant to be drunk fresh.
Does "Big Beer" mean a lot of hops? And small mean less hops?

Is there a general rule of thumb about the aging of a beer or any good articles?
__________________
Life, Liberty, And The Pursuit of Hoppyness

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2007, 04:05 PM   #5
cweston
 
cweston's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2006
Manhattan, KS
Posts: 2,014
Liked 18 Times on 11 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooZer
Does "Big Beer" mean a lot of hops? And small mean less hops?
No--original gravities. Below 40 = small beer (or session beer), about 70 or so = big beer.

The bigger the beer, the more it will tend to benefit from age, generally speaking.
__________________

Primary: none
Secondary:
Bottle conditioning: Robust Porter
Drinking: Saison Dupont clone, tripel
Coming soon: Columbus APA, Rich Red ale

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2007, 06:21 PM   #6
BrooZer
Recipes 
 
Jan 2007
Posts: 340

Quote:
Originally Posted by cweston
No--original gravities. Below 40 = small beer (or session beer), about 70 or so = big beer.

The bigger the beer, the more it will tend to benefit from age, generally speaking.

Does that also tie out to ending alcohol content?
__________________
Life, Liberty, And The Pursuit of Hoppyness

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2007, 07:55 AM   #7
wild
Recipes 
 
Jun 2005
Surprise, AZ.
Posts: 1,488
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts


See this post. It might help.

Wild
__________________
On Tap -
  1. 3 year old Oak Aged Bourbon Porter
  2. Irish Red Rye
  3. Robust Porter
  4. Russian Imperial Stout
  5. Mirror Pond Clone dry hopped with Citra
  6. Mirror Pond Clone dry hopped with Centennial
Primary - Nada
Secondary -
From man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world. -- Saint Arnoldus

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2007, 02:45 PM   #8
boo boo
Recipes 
 
Jun 2005
Hearts's Delight, Newfoundland
Posts: 4,165
Liked 35 Times on 30 Posts


I had a brew last year from a customer who said it was 2 years old (at time of my drinking it) and while it was a bit yeasty it did taste great.
__________________
How do you BBQ an elephant....first you get your elephant....

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2007, 06:48 PM   #9
Mikey
Recipes 
 
Nov 2005
I'm gone!
Posts: 666
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts


I just had the last bottle of a batch I made in 1996 (10 years ago), a Belgian Xmas ale. It was fantastic, wish I had kept the whole batch that long.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2007, 07:55 PM   #10
olllllo
[]-O-[]
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
olllllo's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2006
Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 13,330
Liked 140 Times on 114 Posts


Most beers fall to predators before dying of old age.
__________________
Rabbit And Coyote Schwag
Rob - Phoenix Ambassador to Milwaukee
Where did your avatar go?
Ginger Beer for Moscow Mules Bacon Vodka
Twitter

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Yeast Starter Life Span? fixie Fermentation & Yeast 3 10-18-2009 11:12 PM
Grain life span HBHoss All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 10-18-2009 06:44 PM
Yeast Life Span JamesM Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 10-06-2009 02:23 AM
Life span of bottled brew? UnaBonger Bottling/Kegging 2 09-19-2008 10:57 PM
Grain Life Span beerfan All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 14 12-18-2006 05:23 PM


Forum Jump