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Old 08-29-2010, 12:00 AM   #1
Gropo
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Hey,
I'm brand new to the forum, and this is my first post...what a great resource this forum is! Anyway, I have ingredients for an extract Belgian Trippel on the way (5 gallon batch). Fearing a weak start (done that too many times), I picked up 2 Wyeast 3787 Trappist smack-packs. I plan on making a starter. Is my paranoia driving to overkill, or will a double dose of Trappist be a good thing?

 
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Old 08-29-2010, 03:05 AM   #2
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Most likely it will be a very good thing. Try this: http://www.mrmalty.com/calc/calc.html

 
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Old 08-29-2010, 03:13 AM   #3
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Yep, for sure you will not be overpitching. That sounds like the perfect amount for a relatively warm ferment. Check your planned original gravity and plug it in the calculator linked above just to be sure, but you just want to be in the ballpark.
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Old 08-29-2010, 03:41 AM   #4
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I agree. You won't be overpitching.

 
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Old 08-29-2010, 05:00 AM   #5
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There are a couple tricks you can do to reduce your lag time. First, make sure the starter temperature is close to the temperature of your wort before pitching. If it's too hot, or too cold, you'll stun the yeast. Another thing is to aerate thoroughly. This is especially important in a strong beer like a Tripel. If you do this and pitch the right amount of yeast using the mrmalty calculator, you should be fine.

Also, I'd avoid doing a warm ferment if possible. The best results for 3787 (from my experience) tend to come from starting at 64f and letting it ramp up on its own from there to about 70 on finishing. I get it down this far by dumping the carboy in an ice bath, and patiently waiting for it to reach 64 before pitching.


 
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Old 08-29-2010, 08:37 AM   #6

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Originally Posted by Prionburger View Post
There are a couple tricks you can do to reduce your lag time. First, make sure the starter temperature is close to the temperature of your wort before pitching. If it's too hot, or too cold, you'll stun the yeast. Another thing is to aerate thoroughly. This is especially important in a strong beer like a Tripel. If you do this and pitch the right amount of yeast using the mrmalty calculator, you should be fine..
In my experience, this is not true. I make a big starter ahead of time, then chill the starter 2 days ahead of time. On the day of brewing, I decant the liquid and pour only slurry without warming it, thus pitching cold yeast. And I always have visible activity within 3-6 hours of pitching, even with high gravity beers. Furthermore, a lot of people here do this with equally good results. You can search here for "cold pitching" yeast. I think temperature differential is only a problem when you're reducing the temperature of the yeast, but I've never experienced any lag in fermentation from cold pitching and I've done it a LOT.

Anyway, them's my two cents!
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Old 08-29-2010, 02:59 PM   #7
Gropo
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With my original OG of 1.073, the mr.malty calculator calls for a single pitch with a 3.7 liter starter, but I only have a 1 liter starter flask. Should I combine both smack-packs into the 1 liter starter, or split the difference; 1 pack in the starter, and a "direct from the pack" pitch with the 2nd?

 
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Old 08-29-2010, 03:05 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattHollingsworth View Post
In my experience, this is not true. I make a big starter ahead of time, then chill the starter 2 days ahead of time. On the day of brewing, I decant the liquid and pour only slurry without warming it, thus pitching cold yeast. And I always have visible activity within 3-6 hours of pitching, even with high gravity beers. Furthermore, a lot of people here do this with equally good results. You can search here for "cold pitching" yeast. I think temperature differential is only a problem when you're reducing the temperature of the yeast, but I've never experienced any lag in fermentation from cold pitching and I've done it a LOT.

Anyway, them's my two cents!
That makes sense. My smack packs start to balloon within an hour or two after smacking them straight out of the fridge, as long as the packs aren't that old. Thanks for this; I'm likely going to switch from doing starters the night before to doing them several days in advance and decanting. That way I can do 2 and 3 quarter starters without worrying about impacting the wort.
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Old 08-29-2010, 04:02 PM   #9
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Thanks Matt

The temperature difference between the starter and wort is only a problem if you're reducing the temperature of the yeast. It's a problem I run into because I pitch at high krausen into wort that is colder than room temperature.

 
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Old 08-29-2010, 04:40 PM   #10

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Originally Posted by joety View Post
That makes sense. My smack packs start to balloon within an hour or two after smacking them straight out of the fridge, as long as the packs aren't that old. Thanks for this; I'm likely going to switch from doing starters the night before to doing them several days in advance and decanting. That way I can do 2 and 3 quarter starters without worrying about impacting the wort.
I usually make my starters on Wednesday night, put 'em into the fridge Friday sometime and brew on Sunday. For basic med. gravity beers, 2 liter starters work for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prionburger View Post
Thanks Matt

The temperature difference between the starter and wort is only a problem if you're reducing the temperature of the yeast. It's a problem I run into because I pitch at high krausen into wort that is colder than room temperature.
No problem. Sounds about right.
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