When using dry yeast - how do you proof it? - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Soda Making > When using dry yeast - how do you proof it?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-28-2010, 06:40 PM   #1
callmebruce
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Marietta, GA
Posts: 138
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts



Okay, I'm using the Homemade Soda Rootbeer and Pop book (or whatever Steven Creswell's book is called). Had a question on the yeast. You are supposed to put 1/8 teaspoon of dry yeast in a 1/4 cup lukewarm water and let it sit for a few minutes.

How do you know if the yeast is good? Should it dissolve? If I want to make sure it's good - should I put a little sugar in to give the yeast something to start on? Or just take it as a matter of faith that the yeast is good?

(have rootbeer that has been working a little over three days. Just a little carbonation - not much - so want to make sure I get it right)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 09:30 PM   #2
david_42
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2005
Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,595
Liked 152 Times on 143 Posts


Dry yeast needs to re-hydrated in plain, warm water, that's all. Unless it has been open for a few weeks, you can assume it's good.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 09:39 PM   #3
StoutFan
Recipes 
 
Jan 2009
Wyoming, Michigan
Posts: 922
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts


Dry yeast when properly packaged can have quite a shelf life. Trust the dates on the package, they are your friend.
__________________
Rockin' L Fabrication and Beverages

Gambrinous - to be full of beer

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 09:49 PM   #4
ChshreCat
 
ChshreCat's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2008
Camano Island, Washington
Posts: 11,533
Liked 540 Times on 432 Posts


No proofing here. Just rehydrating in a little warm water. The point of rehydrating is to give it something to just rehydrate the cells without having them suck up a bunch of sugar. When they're rehydrating, they can't control how much of what crosses their cell walls and suddenly sucking up a bunch of sugars can kill many of them. Just rehydrate in plain water and then pitch.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2010, 01:53 AM   #5
callmebruce
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Marietta, GA
Posts: 138
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Thanks for the info!

Next yeast question. When making aone gallon batch of soda, how much yeast should you use if you want high carbonation / a frothy head on your root beer?

I used 1/8 of a teaspoon in a 1/4 cup of lukewarm water. I read some recipes calling for 1/8 teaspoon, others calling for 1/4 in the same basic recipe, and recipes at Mother Earth magazine calling for 1/2 teaspoon for one gallon mixes.

If you go with a small amount (1/8 teaspoon), does it give the same carbonation as 1/4 teaspoon, just takes a little longer? Would 1/2 teaspoon have a heavier yeast taste? How do you make that balance between taste and carbonation (individual taste, so I guess it would be a matter of what I preferred).

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2010, 01:56 AM   #6
the_bird
10th-Level Beer Nerd
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
the_bird's Avatar
Recipes 
 
May 2006
Adams, MA
Posts: 20,889
Liked 528 Times on 424 Posts


I haven't even been re-hydrating lately, and I'll be damned if I can tell a difference. Beer's usually in the basement late-afternoon and fermenting away happily first thing in the morning, which is good enough for me.
__________________
Come join Yankee Ingenuity!

"I'm kind of toasted. But I looked at my watch and it's only 6:30 so I can't stop drinking yet." - Yooper's Bob
"Brown eye finally recovered after the abuse it endured in Ptown last weekend, but it took almost a full week." - Paulie
"no, he just doesn't speak 'stupid'. i, however, am fluent...." - motobrewer
"... I'll go both ways." - Melana

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2010, 01:56 AM   #7
ChshreCat
 
ChshreCat's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2008
Camano Island, Washington
Posts: 11,533
Liked 540 Times on 432 Posts


As long as you have an adequate amount, more yeast won't give you more carbonation. It's the amount of sugar that is available for the yeast to eat that determines the amount of carbonation.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2010, 03:30 AM   #8
callmebruce
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Marietta, GA
Posts: 138
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Thanks. I have rootbeer to refrigerate in the morning (if it lasts that long! Three 12 ounce bottles went to frosty mugs, one 12 ounce bottle was popped in the freezer for a rootbeer slush. I "tested" one last night, then today some have been shared).

Have cream soda just started this afternoon. Hoping to wait until it has carbonation. Have more sugar in the cream soda than was in the rootbeer.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2010, 03:24 AM   #9
callmebruce
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Marietta, GA
Posts: 138
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Next goofy question. When I add the dry yeast to the lukewarm water, then add that to the rootbeer mix - what temperature should the rootbeer mix be? What temperature range is lukewarm?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2010, 03:58 AM   #10
ChshreCat
 
ChshreCat's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2008
Camano Island, Washington
Posts: 11,533
Liked 540 Times on 432 Posts


60's or so. Room temp is fine for pitching. Generally, you want the yeast, the water you rehydrate the yeast in and the liquid you pitch it in to be around the same temp to avoid thermal shock to the yeast. But there's leeway. It ain't rocket surgery, ya know.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sams Club now requiring proof to buy B.I.B. wishiwas Soda Making 15 12-30-2009 12:01 AM


Forum Jump