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Old 08-03-2010, 04:31 AM   #1
mahilly
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Feb 2009
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I just batched an Irish Stout using Safale us-05 yeast. The yeast has a temperature range of 59 to 75 F. Can anyone tell me what the expected difference might be in the final beer flavor between fermenting at the low temperature end compared to the high end?



 
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Old 08-03-2010, 11:12 AM   #2
Brocster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mahilly View Post
I just batched an Irish Stout using Safale us-05 yeast. The yeast has a temperature range of 59 to 75 F. Can anyone tell me what the expected difference might be in the final beer flavor between fermenting at the low temperature end compared to the high end?
Basically, higher temps cause bi-products to be formed, esters mainly, at a rate and type that is different than lower temps. You'll generally get a more "fruity" flavor, or it might seem a bit more twangy. With S-05, my experience is that it gives a little residual sweet, fruity flavor at anything over 72 degrees, and although I do not know from first hand experience, I assume this increases as you get higher.

One way to think of this is not what flavors you will get as you go higher, but how much more crisp you will get as you go lower.


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Old 08-03-2010, 12:06 PM   #3
Justibone
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Also remember: the beer itself can be up to 5 degrees warmer than the room it's in, unless you have it sitting in water or another cooling method is used.

 
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Old 08-03-2010, 01:20 PM   #4
TheWeeb
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+1, tho not hugely experienced yet, my first brew was pitched way too high, fermented way too high and fast (finished in 36 hours) and had so many off flavors I named it Assbock. Since then, I keep it on the low and slow end of things, and have been completely stoked at the results. I really think that aside from proper sanitation this is the most important factor. Temperature. Then Time. Good luck with your Stout!
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Old 08-03-2010, 02:56 PM   #5
Hang Glider
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I remember talking to a fellow at Flying Dog back in 2006 (Denver location) - he said they ferment all their ales at 62F Just some food for thought -



 
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