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Old 07-23-2010, 12:24 PM   #1
blkandrust
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I'm planning on introducing Amylase Enzyme into 2 stuck ferms,later today..Both Beers are in secondary.Should I rack beers over into another carboy which has the Amylase waiting in it?Or can I just pitch the Amylase into the secondary and give it a good swirl or two?


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Old 07-23-2010, 03:43 PM   #2
prosper
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Bad!

Amalyase only works on starches, so if there aren't any starches actually in your beer (and there probably won't be - but we'd need to know more about your recipe and process), they won't do much of anything for you. And if there are, there's no way to control the rate of conversion when amalyase is used like that. It works extremely slowly at fermentation temperatures, and will still be slowly breaking starches into sugars a year from now - leading to excess carbonation and pressure. A debranching enzyme like Bean-o would be even worse, because it splits complex and some caramelized sugars into simpler ones - causing the same excess pressure/bottle-bomb problems as amalyase, only much worse.



 
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Old 07-23-2010, 04:10 PM   #3
blkandrust
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prosper View Post
Bad!

Amalyase only works on starches, so if there aren't any starches actually in your beer (and there probably won't be - but we'd need to know more about your recipe and process), they won't do much of anything for you. And if there are, there's no way to control the rate of conversion when amalyase is used like that. It works extremely slowly at fermentation temperatures, and will still be slowly breaking starches into sugars a year from now - leading to excess carbonation and pressure. A debranching enzyme like Bean-o would be even worse, because it splits complex and some caramelized sugars into simpler ones - causing the same excess pressure/bottle-bomb problems as amalyase, only much worse.

I have two batches that have been stuck for 2 months now..I've tried repitching yeast from starters..one is stuck at 1.035,the other is stuck at 1.023..I'm going to try the Amylase as a last resort..I dont want to dump these beers but I am out of ideas..
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Old 07-23-2010, 07:32 PM   #4
foltster
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I have successfully used amylase to lower the gravity of otherwise finished light beers to dry them out. No real issues and it has taken 2-3 weeks each time to reach a new stable FG. Check out http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f62/mill...hopped-123937/
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Old 07-23-2010, 09:47 PM   #5
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Just add it to the fermenter and rouse the yeast. Yes, it is much slower at fermentation temperatures than at mash temps, but the ratio is around 200:1, so a couple weeks in the fermenter will do the trick.

Even if all of the starches are converted, the complex sugars need to be broken down further so the yeast can absorb them. Amylase will do the trick.

 
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Old 07-23-2010, 09:50 PM   #6
JNye
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i've used it once. i like the results so far.

 
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Old 07-23-2010, 10:11 PM   #7
beowulf
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I've used it recently, and it worked like crazy in my particular situation. You may want to do a search for my earlier post a couple weeks ago, as I give a fair amount of detail with my experience. It brought my beer down from where it was stuck at 1.030 to 1.016 in about a week. After 2 weeks, it finally stopped at about 1.015.

 
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Old 07-23-2010, 10:34 PM   #8
bdleedahl
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I used a half teaspoon in 5 gallons that was stuck at 1.042, and it brought it down to 1.022, they have been in bottles for 3 months now and there is no problem with overcarbonation... worked great for me... mine was stuck because the dry malt extract I was sold contained way too many unfermentable sugars

 
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Old 07-23-2010, 10:52 PM   #9
blkandrust
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Thanks for all the great replies....I was going to ask how much to pitch into 5gallons,then i read that one of you used a half a tsp..Must be strong stuff to use such a small amount..
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Old 04-27-2011, 06:02 PM   #10
fastricky
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So you just dump powder into the fermenter? No need to rehydrate or sanitize?



 
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