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Old 01-19-2012, 09:07 PM   #21
badbrew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unionrdr View Post
The cooper's carb drops are sucrose (table sugar). The Munton's carb drops are dextrose & DME. I got that from there brew tech on the cooper's forums.
And as for bottleing beers,I find I have to let average gravity ales condition (not just carb) for 4-5 weeks before they're aged properly,which takes a bit longer than carbonating from my observations. And I've used the cooper's carb drops before. Besides dextrose,sucrose,demerara sugar. Bulk priming is all too easy,& I prefer that so I can prime to style with more accuracy. But that's me. Do what suits you.
I know my bags say corn sugar or glucose on the label. Maybe there is sucrose in there too.

 
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Old 08-14-2014, 03:25 AM   #22
GNBRennes
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Mar 2012
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I know this is a old thread but I have this happen with my Kolsch I just brewed. Weird thing is that I fermented a 10 gallon batch in my conical together. Then kegged 5g and bottled 5g. The bottles have this sweet homebrewy taste to them when the keg tasted oh so delish. I let the bottles carb for about a month so I dont think it was to short? Cant figure out why? Im thinking about just buying a counter pressure bottle filler and just scraping the corn sugar all together.

 
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Old 05-04-2015, 08:22 PM   #23
oljimmy
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Count me as another homebrewer with this issue and no solution, yet. FGs of my Pale Ales are fine, they can sit in bottles for weeks and weeks and not get any better. I am doing some bottling science on my next batch to see if I can fix it, varying four variables: type of sugar added, temperature of conditioning, obsessiveness of sterilization and aeration during bottling. Hoping one of these is the culprit.
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Old 05-04-2015, 08:40 PM   #24
bobbytuck
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I was the original poster here -- almost 5 years ago -- and I will say that this mystery drove me to stop brewing -- totally. I was getting one batch turning out fine, and then another with the sweet taste. Tried everything -- equipment, priming sugars, etc -- and never nailed it. Frustrated at losing so much beer -- and spending so much time bottling -- I quit. I thought I had it solved (see previous post) but then several more batches had it -- and a couple didn't. I gave up.

For nearly 2 years.

Anyway, I sold my HERMS stuff, bought a PicoBrew, kegged instead of bottled (all in the last two months or so) -- and now my beers (kegged 4 so far) are turning out superb. Smaller batches -- 2.5 gallons instead of 5 -- but the PicoBrew has been amazing. Everything I was doing in my backyard with my massive HERMS is condensed down into the microwave sized picobrew. Plus I brew and ferment in same keg -- and then CO2 transfer to 2.5 gallon serving keg. It's fantastic.

Never solved the sickly sweet, hit-or-miss bottling issue, though. Wasted a lot of money and time -- and while I'm happy now, I regret all the waste (and wasted beer).

I'll still bottle a few here and there (with a Biermuncher setup) -- but the sweet taste took all the fun out of a brew day. I just couldn't stomach all the time for set-up, brewing, tear-down, and cleaning was potentially wasted once the bottles carbed up. I shoulda kegged from the get-go. Never again will I bottle a batch old-school. Ever.

BTW -- two things the PicoBrew alerted me to:

- 2.5 gallon batches are awesome. Less beer, more brewing. I wish someone told me I didn't have to go 5 gallons at a time. Again -- old-school.

- Smaller batches mean experimentation -- and less risk. The PicoBrew day is still long -- about 5 hours including clean-up -- but less grain means more willingness to experiment.

 
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Old 05-04-2015, 08:47 PM   #25
oljimmy
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Hey Bobby, that's really interesting. My thought was that going to kegs would not necessarily help, since my main hypothesis is that fruity esters are being released via carbonation, and this would happen regardless of whether they were force-carbed or bottle-carbed. But it looks like your problem was definitely with the bottles, which is super strange given the number of successful bottlers out there. I'll keep you posted on how this experiment works out, but good on ya for solving things on your end.

It really is driving me insane: I'm all-grain with a fair bit of equipment, sanitization and water control, and I have friends who basically toss some extract+water into a pot with some hops, hardly sanitize at all, and their bottles are delicious.
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Old 05-04-2015, 08:50 PM   #26
bobbytuck
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The only thing I didn't do -- but I don't know if it would have mattered -- is to swap back and forth between StarSan and Idaphor (sp?). It's possible that something could have grown resistant to StarSan.

Someone mentioned that -- switching between sanitizers -- but I never tried it. I always -- and still -- use StarSan for everything. Maybe -- I don't know.

BTW -- 2 recent kegs were primed with corn sugar (.75oz in 2.5 gallons) while they waited for kegerator space. A week of priming and they were carbed pretty well -- and I thought for sure I'd get the sickly sweet taste from the natural priming in the keg -- but I haven't. So I have no idea what it was. Funny, too, because I rarely see it written about or discussed. Just this thread.

 
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Old 05-04-2015, 08:55 PM   #27
oljimmy
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Huh. OK, I might try adding that variable to my experiment... $7 for a bottle on ebay, I'll; give it a shot and see if it makes a difference. I'd rate that as highly unlikely though, since we are both brewing with starsan and the uncarbed beer tasted great (i.e. uninfected). You'd think that the infection would be just as likely to show up in the ferment as in the bottle conditioning.
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Old 05-12-2015, 01:49 AM   #28
oljimmy
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Update: I just performed the bottling experiment today on a nice golden IPA, obsessively cleaning absolutely everything I use and varying a bunch of bottling variables. The fermented wort tastes and smells fantastic, and hopefully my varying a bunch of things (aeration, carbonation sugar used, sanitization of bottles, cleaning of bottles, sanitizer used, carbonation temps, light exposure during carbonation) can help me zero on in what's going on.
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Old 06-03-2015, 08:56 PM   #29
oljimmy
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And here are the results: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=529395

Basic conclusion in my case: probably an infection caused by something on the bottling wand or in the bottling bucket. Nothing else, aeration, drops, sanitization, temps, made any noticeable difference.
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Old 06-03-2015, 09:12 PM   #30
unionrdr
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To answer a few questions, fruity flavors come from esters of some yeasts, like Cooper's. Maybe the beer was under-attenuated, leaving some more malty sweetness behind. Ot your mash temp was too high & made more unfermentable sugars. Gusher infections are always possible. Everything that touches the beer has to be clean; anything that touches the beer post-boil has to be sanitized as well. Starsan shouldn't cause any of these effects. Carbonation will bring up any aroma & flavor that's already in there. but it won't cause it. Most likely something on brew day or during fermentation. The carbonation only made it noticeable.
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