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Old 12-31-2010, 03:01 PM   #31
Lcasanova
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Cool- well if it works then there is a "pre-malted" quinoa- no complaints from me.
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Old 12-31-2010, 04:02 PM   #32
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Why do you want to malt Quiona? Why not just toast it for flavor?
It seems to me that if you sprout something, something else gets used up, like starch/sugar. If your adding enzymes and not getting any enzymes from the grain, why bother?

 
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Old 12-31-2010, 08:25 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hex View Post
Why do you want to malt Quiona? Why not just toast it for flavor?
It seems to me that if you sprout something, something else gets used up, like starch/sugar. If your adding enzymes and not getting any enzymes from the grain, why bother?
So I could use it in a mash since I can't really go out and buy gluten-free base malts or specialty malts. But otherwise, what you said above.
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Old 12-31-2010, 09:11 PM   #34
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If you toast raw Quiona and grind it, you can use that in a mash as well.

How do you think Sake is made? I don't think they malt the rice before they put it through saccharification.

I was under the impression that only reason to malt anything is to activate the enzymes which allow for self conversion. If your going to add enzymes, why bother?

 
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Old 12-31-2010, 09:12 PM   #35
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I eat Quiona, and like it! Interested in your beer idea.

 
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Old 01-02-2011, 05:24 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hex View Post
If you toast raw Quiona and grind it, you can use that in a mash as well.

How do you think Sake is made? I don't think they malt the rice before they put it through saccharification.

I was under the impression that only reason to malt anything is to activate the enzymes which allow for self conversion. If your going to add enzymes, why bother?
With sake the starch conversion is done with mold.

Koji is rice that has had aspergillus oryzae (koji-kin) mold grown on it. This special mold has an interesting property: it secretes enzymes that convert starch to sugar. If you add it to a soupy mash of rice, water, and yeast, the result is fermentation.
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Old 01-05-2011, 04:42 PM   #37
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Vlax is right, and to fully answer the question, it is because only some of the enzymes are readily available to us.

 
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Old 01-05-2011, 06:27 PM   #38
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one thing I've been wondering about the whole malting/ vs a. amylase question. I've been reading a book on raw food which had some info that go me thinking. According to the book the nutritive value of a see/grain increases greatly after germination(notice where not even talking about getting although way to sprouted yet) so more than just enzyme production is taking place. Makes me wonder if it's not possible to reproduce the same flavors qualities using unmalted grains and mashing with added enzymes? I'm willing to concede that it's entirely possible that the changes have an insignificant affect on flavor in beer, but..............not knowing is not knowing if you know what I mean

Second thought was that since germination is much easier to do efficiently than full on sprouting. We could easily germinate then dry and roast GF grains which would encompass many of the changes in the seed/grains and then add enzymes to do the actual conversion. Just a few thoughts that I've been mulling over.
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Old 01-05-2011, 06:37 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fermentedhiker View Post
Second thought was that since germination is much easier to do efficiently than full on sprouting. We could easily germinate then dry and roast GF grains which would encompass many of the changes in the seed/grains and then add enzymes to do the actual conversion. Just a few thoughts that I've been mulling over.
I think for the time being, I'm always going add enzymes, despite malting my grain. I'd love to say I was able to get a full conversion on my own, but with all the time and work put into malting and a GF brew day, I'm more interested in getting something out of it. And I'll continue to malt until I find a place that I can buy beta amylase... Or any future sweet potato experiments provide good results.

 
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Old 01-07-2011, 06:09 PM   #40
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ive been gone for a while but now im back. from what ive read, getting full starch conversion, even with glutenous brewing it is still some of a holy grail (from books and peers). though i could be compeletly full of S but most people strive for70-80 percent conversion, i havent read much about 90%+ conversion . so if were getting conversion from either home malted or pre sprouted (havent tried nor seen presprouted) it would just be a matter of refining the process. getting better milling consistencies, consistent mashing temps. consistent boil temps. consistant ferm temps ect. ect. not to say that it cant be done but that it can be challenging.

 
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