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Old 06-29-2010, 03:57 AM   #1


Was just reading the Cascadian Dark Ale article in the most recent BYO and was wondering why not add a couple more styles to the mix. If a CDA is essentially a dark American IPA (defined by citrusy American hops), why not also add Britannian Dark Ale for dark English IPA, characterized by English hops? And why not a Germanic Dark Ale - though maybe we should first start with a Germanic IPA (Continental IPA?)


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Old 06-29-2010, 04:07 AM   #2
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I suppose you could if those proposed styles became popular...



 
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Old 06-29-2010, 06:38 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JLem View Post
And why not a Germanic Dark Ale
Because the Germans don't historically make barley ales. The only 2 exceptions are the 2 hybrid pseudo-lagers (kolsches and altbiers).

They've already got schwarzbier to cover dark lagers.

The only straight ales they make are non-barley beers. There's already a dunkelweizen style to embrace dark wheat beers. I guess the next dark variant of a German beer that makes sense would be a dunkelroggen (dark rye).
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Old 06-29-2010, 08:59 AM   #4
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Styles are added as variations emerge and become popular. If those styles became popular they might be added. I'd personally like to see an addition in the strong ale category. Think Stone Arrogant Bastard. The strong ale category goes from old ales right into Barleywines. There needs to be a style just for strong ales or stock ales that covers a high gravity ale that is not long aged. They try to capture that in old ales, but old ales talks too much about flavors and colors of aging and oxidation.
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Old 06-29-2010, 02:39 PM   #5
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I hope the name Cascadian Dark Ale goes away along with those disgusting IPA's made with Belgian yeast...Ugh I can't wait for that fad to die completely. Just call it a freaking Black IPA, it doesn't need it's own style guideline, it isn't a defining style representing a beer culture or history. It's just lame.
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Old 06-29-2010, 05:02 PM   #6
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I was actually a bit surprised when they proposed adding cascadian dark ale. I'm with you smizak on just calling it what it is, a Black IPA. I've enjoyed IPAs made with belgian yeasts, but definitely don't feel it needs a style category of it's own.

Next proposed style I see on the horizon is American Wild Ale. Sour is the new IPA and breweries like Russian River and Jolly Pumpkin are doing some cool stuff with the wild yeasts.
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Old 06-29-2010, 05:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wscott823 View Post
Next proposed style I see on the horizon is American Wild Ale. Sour is the new IPA and breweries like Russian River and Jolly Pumpkin are doing some cool stuff with the wild yeasts.
That I'm a little more on board with. There is nothing like those beers anywhere in the world, and they are truly artisanal examples. Very unique, and have generated a new viewpoint of beer in the States as a "gourmet" food item. Just adding some de-husked Carafa to an IPA doesn't do that for me.

I've never been lucky enough to try a Russian River beer, but I can get Jolly Pumpkin here in Buffalo, and I absolutely love them. The Calabaza Blanca after busting my a$$ in my lawn and garden a month ago was the most refreshing beer I've ever had.
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Old 06-29-2010, 05:42 PM   #8
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I'm not a fan of the term Cascadian Dark Ale. I brewed up an American Stout, and while not exactly a beer of that style, it was close. I called it a Black IPA, or Strong American Stout.

You simply cannot create a name and style category for every beer there is. The possibilities are endless. The BJCP styles cover the popular categories because they are useful for judging the skill of the brewer, not because a beer sitting between two styles isn't a really good beer. They also have a couple of categories to encompass as many of those non-category beers as possible, simply to try and include beer that won't win a medal in a traditional category, and to encourage innovation.

But when a style emerges, such as a Dark IPA, it warrants consideration of inclusion into the style guidelines. I fully expect to see wild yeast categories in the future if they could ever agree to exactly what defines the style.
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Old 06-29-2010, 05:44 PM   #9
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I've been attempting to get my paws on some Supplication, but again the same problem in MD, very limited distribution of RR. I've been meaning to pick up a bottle of Allagash's Confluence, but am trying to get over sticker shock. You tried any of Allagash's wilds?
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Old 06-29-2010, 05:55 PM   #10
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Black IPA == Black India Pale Ale


I can't be the only person that sees a problem with that name.


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