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Old 06-26-2010, 09:06 PM   #1
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Default The different yeast species (not strains) used in alcohol production

Hi all,

I was wondering what are the different yeast species used and what are their different traits.

I know the common ale yeast is S . Cerevisiae , and I think the lager one is S. pastorianus. and then there is Brett, too.

What about S. Bayanus ?
and generally how strict are the uses of these species for their ale - lager classification ?


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Old 06-26-2010, 09:31 PM   #2
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Technically, weizen yeast is Torulaspora delbrueckii. Learned that yesterday!


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Old 06-27-2010, 12:16 AM   #3
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Kluveromyces lactis makes some kind of fermented milk
Schizosaccharomyces pombe is used for rum
Zygosaccharomyces fermentati has been tossed around for wine, though it isn't used commercially, IIRC
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Old 06-27-2010, 04:21 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohad View Post
Hi all,

I was wondering what are the different yeast species used and what are their different traits.

I know the common ale yeast is S . Cerevisiae , and I think the lager one is S. pastorianus. and then there is Brett, too.

What about S. Bayanus ?
and generally how strict are the uses of these species for their ale - lager classification ?
Brettanomyces (Brett) is a genus. There are several different species used in brewing-Brett bruxellensis, B. Lambicus, B. Clausenii, and B. Anomalus are the most common.
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Old 06-27-2010, 12:34 PM   #5
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Quote:
and generally how strict are the uses of these species for their ale - lager classification ?
The problem with answering that is work done by lab folks back in the day confuses it. The type strain used for lab work and the granddaddy of most all of them is S288c and it's a cross of Fleischmann's bread yeast by a Carlsberg lager strain and maybe something else tossed in there*, then sporulated (its name means the C pick from Spore 288). This was considered the "type" for Saccharomyces cereviseae, and it's the yeast whose DNA was sequenced in the early 1990's.
So, because the "type" was a blend, the taxonomists lumped a lot of Saccharomyces species into cereviseae.
With the recent advent of "Next Gen" DNA sequence, it's getting a LOT cheaper to sequence an entire genome, so a lot of work is going into sequencing more wild-type isolates (of a lot more than just yeast) and I suspect that we'll see re-division of the genus.
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Old 06-27-2010, 12:43 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnMc View Post
The problem with answering that is work done by lab folks back in the day confuses it. The type strain used for lab work and the granddaddy of most all of them is S288c and it's a cross of Fleischmann's bread yeast by a Carlsberg lager strain and maybe something else tossed in there*, then sporulated (its name means the C pick from Spore 288). This was considered the "type" for Saccharomyces cereviseae, and it's the yeast whose DNA was sequenced in the early 1990's.
So, because the "type" was a blend, the taxonomists lumped a lot of Saccharomyces species into cereviseae.
With the recent advent of "Next Gen" DNA sequence, it's getting a LOT cheaper to sequence an entire genome, so a lot of work is going into sequencing more wild-type isolates (of a lot more than just yeast) and I suspect that we'll see re-division of the genus.
That's very interesting!
I'm a bioinformatics student, and I was looking for some beer related yeast project. I'll look into some papers on the issue of taxonomy of yeast species, and see if I can distill a research project out of this problem. Thanks!
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Old 06-27-2010, 05:04 PM   #7
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Quote:
I'll look into some papers on the issue of taxonomy of yeast species, and see if I can distill a research project out of this problem.
The paper that looked into the history of lab yeast was by the Lindegrens, early '90's, IIRC, I remember the pedigree chart & a couple of other things.
www.yeastgenome.org isn't a bad start.
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Old 06-27-2010, 05:07 PM   #8
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yeah, thanks. I use SGD a lot for lab reports


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