Flanders Red in only 9 weeks? - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Flanders Red in only 9 weeks?
Cool Brewing Corny 5G & Mini Giveaway

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-09-2010, 05:54 PM   #1
Morkin
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 318
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1


Has anyone read "Wild Brews" by Jeff Sparrow?

On his Flanders Red Receipe, he states that a a Flanders Red needs to be brewed at 68 degrees for one week, typical ale schedule.

He then says to do a secondary with the bugs for 1 year at celler temperatures, or 8 weeks at 80 degrees.

Seeing how it is summer and I can leave my fermenter in a spare bedroom at 80 degrees, this intrigues me greatly. I was planing on a Flanders Red soon, and this seems like a great alternative to the many years I planed on doing sours.

2 questions, am I reading this correctly, and second, will it have dramatically different tastes that I shouldn't even bother doing it? Thanks for any help.


__________________
Drinking - Germann Pumpkin Ale
Primary- Schwarzbier
Secondary - Nothing
Bottled - Gose, Eisbock
Kegged - Nothing
Next Batch -
Planning - Berliner Weisse

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 05:56 PM   #2
carnevoodoo
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 4,260
Liked 17 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 5


There's no way you're going to have a Flanders red in 9 weeks. If there was some sort off magical shortcut to making these beers, the breweries that make them would be employing that strategy. These types of sours need the time to really work. I would be patient and go the distance.


__________________
http://chugsd.com

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 06:16 PM   #3
Morkin
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 318
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1


thats what I figured, but wasn't sure if the high 80 degree temp would allow the bugs to work faster....
__________________
Drinking - Germann Pumpkin Ale
Primary- Schwarzbier
Secondary - Nothing
Bottled - Gose, Eisbock
Kegged - Nothing
Next Batch -
Planning - Berliner Weisse

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 06:22 PM   #4
JoMarky
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 357
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts


The bugs would work faster, and it would be "done" sooner, but I doubt it will taste the same. Regular yeast will ferment faster and be done quicker at 80 degrees too, but there's reasons nobody takes that short cut.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 06:58 PM   #5
ChrisKennedy
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Pittsburg, California
Posts: 385
Liked 12 Times on 11 Posts


You could have an interesting faux-Flanders Red in 9 weeks if you do a sour mash for the sourness and ferment 100% with Brett L or Brett B to get some of that nice funk.

It won't be authentic, but it should taste really good.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 07:04 PM   #6
wscott823
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Posts: 482
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 1


If you're alright forgoing the pedio & brett characteristics of a flanders then I suppose it may work for you. If you're expecting to get a Rodenbach in 9 wks you'll be sadly disappointed. The best brews take time and you need to listen to the beer.
__________________
Primary: Nada
Lagering/Secondary: Nada
Micro Barrel Aging: H2O & Metabisulfite
Bottled: Sparkling Ambrosia, Chai Graff, Cerberus Barleywine, Jamil's Evil Twin, Chinook IPA
Planned Brews: Devil's Serum (Golden Strong Ale)

Make Your Own Belgian Candi Syrup

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 07:21 PM   #7
Morkin
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 318
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1


Thanks guys. I'll probably just do the years method instead of the super fast and easy method. I'm no newbie to brewing, only sours, and I've acquired the mindset of not rushing beers, even though I like my beers to come out fast! Thanks for all the feedback.
__________________
Drinking - Germann Pumpkin Ale
Primary- Schwarzbier
Secondary - Nothing
Bottled - Gose, Eisbock
Kegged - Nothing
Next Batch -
Planning - Berliner Weisse

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 07:41 PM   #8
jessup
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: asheville, nc
Posts: 668
Liked 16 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 5


while probably impossible, it couldn't hurt to try b4 you go to waiting for years. if you have an open fermenter take the two to three months and give it a shot. i still think 6 mos. minimum for any decent sour, but it can't hurt to try. after all, there are no golden rules for sours. by fermenting in a bucket you'll give it a lot of O2 exposure to get the acidity going early on. i've gotta few brett only sours that i plan on bottling and begin drinking <6 mos. for the third time, it can never hurt to try
__________________
set I: Pale (3) -> Mild (4-5) -> amber / Victory (20-25) -> special roast (40-50) -> brown (70)
set II: pilsner (2) -> Vienna (3-4) -> Munich (8-10) -> dark Munich (20) -> aromatic / melanoiden (25-30)
encore: smoked (5)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 08:57 PM   #9
maskednegator
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: san diego
Posts: 322
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 1


Quote:
Originally Posted by carnevoodoo View Post
If there was some sort off magical shortcut to making these beers, the breweries that make them would be employing that strategy.
I think that's a pretty silly argument. There are plenty of traditional techniques that are practiced over better modern techniques - turbid mash, koelschip, decoction - for no reason other than tradition.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 02:20 PM   #10
Oldsock
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: DC, Washington DC
Posts: 3,229
Liked 250 Times on 166 Posts
Likes Given: 174


Quote:
Originally Posted by maskednegator View Post
I think that's a pretty silly argument. There are plenty of traditional techniques that are practiced over better modern techniques - turbid mash, koelschip, decoction - for no reason other than tradition.
And as soon as a "Modern" brewery brews a beer as good as the Lambics/Gueuzes I've had from Cantillon, Drie Fonteinen etc... I'll believe you. These techniques require time/skill that many brewers don't have, but when used correctly it is certainly not just for "tradition" (that is the silly argument).

The warmer ferment will certainly speed up the souring, but you won't get the depth and complexity that a longer/cooler fermentation will give. I think it is certainly worth a shot, but get a normal batch going too, the sooner the better.


__________________
Check out The Mad Fermentationist for my adventures in fermentation and my book: American Sour Beers!

 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fruit for Flanders Red? BigWhitey_FrostBox Lambic & Wild Brewing 16 02-02-2013 01:30 PM
3 weeks 70? Is anyone's beer really that good after only 3 weeks in the bottle? TheH2 Bottling/Kegging 29 12-11-2012 08:39 PM
Flanders Red for a first sour s3n8 Recipes/Ingredients 8 06-12-2009 02:03 PM
Oak in Flanders Red Jsta Porter Lambic & Wild Brewing 5 05-15-2009 01:26 AM
Flanders red? claphamsa Lambic & Wild Brewing 20 04-01-2009 03:58 PM


Forum Jump