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Old 05-23-2010, 02:14 PM   #1
spinoza
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Default Amylase powder: Alpha or Beta ?

Is "amylase powder" sold by brew supply companies: Alpha or Beta Amylase ?


http://www.austinhomebrew.com/produc...roducts_id=447


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Old 05-23-2010, 04:12 PM   #2
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Alpha, which works at fermentation temperatures. Just takes longer, but then, so does the fermentation.


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Old 05-23-2010, 04:24 PM   #3
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Hi David,
Sounds like maybe Beta-Amylase based on temperature characteristics ??


Austin HomeBrew description:
"Amylase enzyme is a naturally occurring enzyme that is used to aid in the conversion of starches to sugars in the all grain brewing process. It is especially helpful in low malt lighter beers. This enzyme will begin to denature at temperatures above 149 F (65 C). At temperatures around 158 F (70C), the enzyme will denature after about 60 minutes."


http://www.austinhomebrew.com/produc...roducts_id=447
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Old 05-23-2010, 04:26 PM   #4
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I used Beta amylase powder with great success for a stuck fermentation 1 tablespoon to 5 gallons if I remember right. Mine was Crosby Baker purchased from the local homebrew shop. I started a thread here a while back detailing how I used the enzymes.
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Old 05-23-2010, 04:29 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greggor View Post
I used Beta amylase powder with great success for a stuck fermentation 1 tablespoon to 5 gallons if I remember right. Mine was Crosby Baker purchased from the local homebrew shop. I started a thread here a while back detailing how I used the enzymes.
Really, you found beta amylase? I'm doing experiments on gluten free grains, but all I have is alpha and gama amylase. Would you be willing to ship me some?
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Old 05-23-2010, 05:04 PM   #6
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I have come across something called "Attenuzyme" which is a mix of enzymes for brewers, and includes Alpha-amylase, which i have never used, but i want Beta-amylase.


Attenuzyme Flex is a high-performing, fast-acting combination of glucoamylase, specific alpha-amylase, and an innovative debranching enzyme (patent pending)

http://www.beveragedaily.com/smartle...sistent-simple


http://www.novozymes.com/en/MainStru...yme/Attenuzyme
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Old 05-23-2010, 08:11 PM   #7
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No, it's alpha. Beta de-natures in 40-60 minutes at 150F, much faster at 158F. That's one big reason higher temperatures mean a less fermentable wort. Unless a product explicitly says it's beta (or a mix), assume alpha. That's much more common.


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