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Old 05-19-2010, 06:01 PM   #1
jonbomb
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Default Yeast at bottom of bottles.

Ok so I put a post up a week or two ago about the white stuff at the bottom of my bottles.

I was just curious what would happen if i put the bottle upside down and moved the bottle around a little bit to get all of that off of the bottom....would that hurt carbonation.

I did use priming sugar and I did boil it.
No I did not goto secondary.


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Old 05-19-2010, 06:07 PM   #2
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Won't hurt anything, but why do you want to mix it up?


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Old 05-19-2010, 06:10 PM   #3
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I don't know could it possibly mix the yeast up to give my beer more carbonation in the end??

It's kinda like not mixing up a bottle of chocolate milk before you drink it and all the chocolate is at the bottom of the bottle...
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Old 05-19-2010, 06:12 PM   #4
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That is the yeast sediment from carbonating your bottles. It's in all bottle conditioned beers, homebrew and otherwise.

It's just that for the last 150 years or so americans have been conditioned by the BMC brewers to pretty much know only about fliltered crystal clear light lagers. Until the 80's with the rise of craft breweries and great import availability of beers from around the world, you didn't see many commercial beers with sediment in it.

And if you've only been exposed to BMC's then you're not going to know or understand about bottle conditioned or living beers. Especially also if you've consumed said beers in the bottle.

We get folks like that on here all the time, who think there is something wrong because their beer has sediment in it, or want to filter it out. It's really a culture thing, you don't so much of that in the rest of the beer world.

Read this for more info On bottle yeast. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/anyo...8/#post1379528


And then watch this video;

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Old 05-19-2010, 06:13 PM   #5
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If your carbonation is lacking then what you are proposing, along with a warmer temp, may help but if the yeast has consumed the residual sugars then all it will do is cloud up the beer. If the carbonation is okay then I'd say leave it be, unless it a Weissbier of course.
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Old 05-19-2010, 06:15 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonbomb View Post
I don't know could it possibly mix the yeast up to give my beer more carbonation in the end??

It's kinda like not mixing up a bottle of chocolate milk before you drink it and all the chocolate is at the bottom of the bottle...
It won't give you more carbonation, it will settle back down.

If you beer is not carbonated enough, then the simple answer is that it is simply not time yet.

The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.


Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

There's even a nifty video showing carbonation over time.
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Old 05-19-2010, 08:31 PM   #7
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[QUOTE=Revvy;2069083]It won't give you more carbonation, it will settle back down.

If you beer is not carbonated enough, then the simple answer is that it is simply not time yet.

The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.


Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

QUOTE]

You must do a lot of cutting and pasting. I have seen you answer this same question probably 30 times since I've been on here. I even read your dissertation about the beer that fermented at too high of a temp that you found after a year that had finally cleaned itself up.
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Old 05-19-2010, 09:04 PM   #8
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I thought lower temps will make it carb more? Based on the fact that you need less priming sugar when carbing at lower temps.

However, i'm assuming this method takes longer to carb.

So if it was too hot, then I'm thinking the yeast ate the sugar, and because of the heat, c02 had less volume = flat beer.

Am I wrong?
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Old 05-19-2010, 09:15 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
It's in all bottle conditioned beers, homebrew and otherwise.
Not quite all. Most people assume that if there is no sediment then the beer is force carbonated or bulk carbonated but a few breweries bottle condition beers and manage to keep yeast to a small enough level that you don't see the sediment layer. Sierra Nevada comes to mind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
It's just that for the last 150 years or so americans have been conditioned by the BMC brewers to pretty much know only about fliltered crystal clear light lagers.
Nitpicking a bit, but 150 years is more than a bit of a stretch, don't you think?
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Old 05-19-2010, 09:20 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorRobert View Post
I thought lower temps will make it carb more? Based on the fact that you need less priming sugar when carbing at lower temps.

However, i'm assuming this method takes longer to carb.

So if it was too hot, then I'm thinking the yeast ate the sugar, and because of the heat, c02 had less volume = flat beer.

Am I wrong?
I have never heard of needing less sugar when carbing at lower temps, only less sugar if the beer fermented at lower temps because more co2 would still be disolved in the beer before bottling.


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