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Old 07-22-2010, 04:59 PM   #131
Brewham
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I wonder why the yeast would drop faster just because it is in a new bucket. Wouldn't it drop just as fast in the primary? What would cause the yeast to remain in suspension longer in the primary that it would in a new bucket?

I am not arguing with your results - just wondering why that would be. I always thought he purpose of the secondary was to get off the yeast cake and trub. It really had nothing to do with making the beer appear clearer.



 
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Old 07-22-2010, 05:04 PM   #132
Walker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewham View Post
I wonder why the yeast would drop faster just because it is in a new bucket. Wouldn't it drop just as fast in the primary? What would cause the yeast to remain in suspension longer in the primary that it would in a new bucket?

I am not arguing with your results - just wondering why that would be. I always thought he purpose of the secondary was to get off the yeast cake and trub. It really had nothing to do with making the beer appear clearer.
I honestly have no idea why it would be this way. I couldn't think of any reason why it would settle faster in a secondary than in a primary, which is why I went ahead and tried it to see what happened.

Maybe my results are not typical, but I did at least try the no-secondary with more than one batch before forming my opinion.


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Old 07-22-2010, 05:33 PM   #133
joety
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I don't know if this is helpful, but in winemaking you tend to rack the wine back and forth multiple times in an effort to "polish" it. I have not made wine in years, but I seem to recall that clarification was a primary reason for doing this.
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Old 07-22-2010, 05:40 PM   #134
Denny
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walker View Post
I honestly have no idea why it would be this way. I couldn't think of any reason why it would settle faster in a secondary than in a primary, which is why I went ahead and tried it to see what happened.

Maybe my results are not typical, but I did at least try the no-secondary with more than one batch before forming my opinion.
I did the no secondary thing for 2-3 years before deciding to try secondary again. I think it has something to do with the physical motion of moving the beer to secondary, but I have no science to back that up.
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Old 07-22-2010, 09:18 PM   #135
Kahuna
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A couple of years ago, I tried this experiment: I brewed 10 gallons and split it evenly between two carboys. One I left in a primary for four weeks and the other I moved to secondary after two weeks. Both were kegged at four weeks, conditioned on CO2 for three weeks and brought to a homebrew club meeting for a blind tasting.

There were some subtle differences between the two. Half the club preferred the primary only, the other half the secondary version. What was interesting was that a couple of our most vocal "Primary Only" advocates liked the secondary version better and one of our Secondary advocates liked the "primary only" better.

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Old 08-17-2010, 12:51 PM   #136
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I've not heard that four weeks is standard here. I've heard minimum 10-11 days, preferably three weeks. I think the commentary has also said if you leave it up to four weeks nor worries about autolysis.
I just bottled an American Wheat on August 1st that was in the plastic primary bucket for almost six weeks. Forget autolysis. It may exist, but don't worry about it. Indulge your yeast. They keep working long after the enclosed directions tell you.
This American Wheat is so clear, it is amazing. Now, I know you should pour 2/3s of it, swirl and pour the rest, but I can't bring myself to do it. You have probably seen pics of Kristallweizen. This beer is almost that clear.
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Old 08-17-2010, 01:14 PM   #137
Rick500
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I just won second place in competition with a barleywine that was in primary on the yeast for about 16 weeks. No worries at all.

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Old 08-17-2010, 03:43 PM   #138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Starderup View Post
I just bottled an American Wheat on August 1st that was in the plastic primary bucket for almost six weeks. Forget autolysis. It may exist, but don't worry about it. Indulge your yeast. They keep working long after the enclosed directions tell you.
This American Wheat is so clear, it is amazing. Now, I know you should pour 2/3s of it, swirl and pour the rest, but I can't bring myself to do it. You have probably seen pics of Kristallweizen. This beer is almost that clear.
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I just won second place in competition with a barleywine that was in primary on the yeast for about 16 weeks. No worries at all.
This is great guys, and congrats on the medal Rick. I just popped open my APA which was in the primary for 5 weeks - crystal clear
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Old 08-17-2010, 05:18 PM   #139
borealis
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Has anyone observed that the type of yeast makes a difference? I've been doing the one month primary and have liked the results, but I do notice a difference in the sediment at the bottom of my bottles depending on the yeast that I have used. Some is much more compact and some is easier to disturb when pouring. I know that yeasts have different flocculation attributes, but am wondering if this plays a role in this discussion in terms of clarity. Thanks.

 
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Old 08-26-2010, 01:08 AM   #140
Dziuggy
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just read fthough all of this. i just brewed belgian strong pale, on monday now trying to decide on fermentation schedule. it seems like lots of people like primary only, so i am inclined to do that (especialy this being big beer - sg 1.085 or so)

i bottle for the time beeing and most proponents of primary only seem to keg. so is it ok to leave it in primary for 3-4 weeks and then bottle? or should i leave it longer in the primary.

cheers



 
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