Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Anyone ever add nasturtium flowers?
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Old 05-02-2010, 07:18 PM   #1
dunnright00
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Default Anyone ever add nasturtium flowers?

Just like the title says. Anyone ever add nasturtium flowers to their beer?

The edible petals add a kind of peppery spice to salads, I wonder what it would taste like as a beer addition?


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Old 05-02-2010, 07:51 PM   #2
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I've tried them, but not in beer.

Might be interesting.


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Old 05-02-2010, 09:37 PM   #3
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I would worry about this because I'm doubtful that cooking them would be tasty. I think you'd get to much vegetal matter doing this, though this is just a suspicion.
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Old 05-03-2010, 01:28 AM   #4
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I was thinking of putting them in secondary, so no cooking would be involved.

For sanitary purposes, maybe I should freeze them first?
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Old 05-03-2010, 03:37 AM   #5
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I'm of the opinion that if you let your yeast finish up in primary, then anything introduced in secondary won't have much to eat so won't be able to do much of anything.
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Old 05-03-2010, 03:53 AM   #6
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But the yeast don't need to do anything to most of the stuff you might want to add in a secondary. Hops, spices, etc.
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Old 05-03-2010, 03:58 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick500 View Post
But the yeast don't need to do anything to most of the stuff you might want to add in a secondary. Hops, spices, etc.
Right, but i'm talking the bugs that can get introduced on your flowers, fruits, hops, etc.

I shoulda been more clear.
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Old 05-03-2010, 04:00 AM   #8
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Oh, I see. Makes sense.

There are bugs, of course, that can eat stuff that yeast don't.

But you do have a better chance of avoiding infection after the alcohol has been produced by the yeast.
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Old 05-03-2010, 01:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick500 View Post
Oh, I see. Makes sense.

There are bugs, of course, that can eat stuff that yeast don't.

But you do have a better chance of avoiding infection after the alcohol has been produced by the yeast.
Right, fermented beer is a pretty low ph environment that isn't conducive to most bacteria or wild yeasts staying alive & active.


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