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Old 04-29-2010, 10:52 PM   #1
thedude00
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Default 2 1/2 gallon batches

I am looking to make some small batch's like Double Chocolate Stout . I know i wont me drinking it much so i was thinking of splitting the recipe in half. Going to get a 3 gallon carboy for secondary fermentation. But i can not found a 3 plastic bucket. So my question is ... Is it ok to use a 6.5 gallon or 5 gallon if i ca found one? I was even thinking of getting two 2 gallon buckets


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Old 04-29-2010, 10:57 PM   #2
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If you use something with a ton of headspace, you just need to be mindful of when it is done and transfer quickly. You could also just use a 3gal carboy for primary and secondary.


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Old 04-29-2010, 11:28 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkershner View Post
If you use something with a ton of headspace, you just need to be mindful of when it is done and transfer quickly. You could also just use a 3gal carboy for primary and secondary.
Wouldn't the CO2 on top protect it all the same as long as it stays closed? If not, let me know cuz I have a 3gal batch in a 5gal carboy as we speak.
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Old 04-29-2010, 11:39 PM   #4
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That much head space is a potential problem. I use a 6 and a half gal bucket for 5 gal primary and hit it with about 30 seconds of CO2 when I close it up to move the air out. Before I started kegging and got the CO2 I just made sure that I used a yeast starter so I got a quick start to the fermentation and the production of CO2 from the wort. I never had any real problems but anytime you expose to air you increase potential for foregin yeast.
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Old 04-29-2010, 11:41 PM   #5
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yes, the co2 will keep it safe no matter how large the carboy/bucket. I do 2.5 gallon batches all the time in my 5 gallon carboy. I would skip the secondary all together...its old school and has been proven repeatedly that it isn't necessary. If you still want to do a secondary, then you do have an issue with headspace...and you might want to invest in a 3 gallon better bottle or glass carboy. I haven't done a secondary in years and I leave it in the primary for 3 or sometimes 4 weeks with no issues at all.
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Old 04-29-2010, 11:59 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcp27 View Post
Wouldn't the CO2 on top protect it all the same as long as it stays closed? If not, let me know cuz I have a 3gal batch in a 5gal carboy as we speak.
This setup will be fine for primary fermentation, the amount of CO2 produced by fermentation will quickly clear the headspace long before fermentation finishes. So as long as the beer is in the primary fermenter and remains sealed there is no possibility of oxidation.

Your problem will occur when you transfer to secondary fermentation, if you need to. For secondary the goal is to have as little head room in the fermenter as possible to reduce the possibilty of oxidation. The more head room in the fermenter the higher risk, also the longer it is in the fermenter the higher risk there is.
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Old 04-30-2010, 02:02 AM   #7
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great info thanks. when i do small batch ill started not to rack to a secondary use my 5 gallon carboy i would have to us a blow off tube right not a airlock. I just racked a batch to my secondary tonight its came out to be like 4 1/2 gallon is there to much headspace in my 5 gallon carboy.
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Old 04-30-2010, 02:09 AM   #8
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I always do 2.5 gallons batch in 7 gallons bucket for a primary. With two beers so far, didn't have any oxidation problem. Normal : CO2 is heavier than air, which means it tends to stay in the bucket and push O2 out.

But, for secondary, I use a 3 gallons carboy to minimize headspace. No more CO2 produced when you secondary.

I also think oxidation problem is a greatly exaggerated problem in homebrewing, as far as I saw here.
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Old 04-30-2010, 01:32 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bguzz View Post
yes, the co2 will keep it safe no matter how large the carboy/bucket. I do 2.5 gallon batches all the time in my 5 gallon carboy. I would skip the secondary all together...its old school and has been proven repeatedly that it isn't necessary. If you still want to do a secondary, then you do have an issue with headspace...and you might want to invest in a 3 gallon better bottle or glass carboy. I haven't done a secondary in years and I leave it in the primary for 3 or sometimes 4 weeks with no issues at all.
My buckets always sealed terribly. Co2 is heavier, but the gasses will still diffuse. Its a small risk, but I like to avoid them where I can, hence me saying get it out quick.

Oxidation on the whole is a fairly small risk to the homebrewer, but can and has happened to people. It usually comes in the form of not purging a keg, but fermenters have been known to expose to oxygen as well.
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Old 04-30-2010, 01:36 PM   #10
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just racked a batch to my secondary tonight its came out to be like 4 1/2 gallon is there to much headspace in my 5 gallon carboy should i worry about oxidation


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