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Old 04-18-2010, 07:02 PM   #1
mximus11
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Default Cold Crashing?

I am pretty sure I understand that cold crashing helps clarify beer but I am not quite sure of the process. Can someone fill me in?


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Old 04-18-2010, 07:09 PM   #2
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As far as I know cold crashing causes the proteins that are suspended in the beer to clump together and fall out of suspension.


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Old 04-18-2010, 07:58 PM   #3
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So do I just put the carbot in the fridge after fermentation for like 2 days to let protiens etlle then rack to bottle?
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Old 04-18-2010, 10:43 PM   #4
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I usually lower my fermentation freezer to around 33-35 for a couple of days before racking to my keg. Beer comes out very clear.
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Old 03-30-2011, 10:56 PM   #5
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Getting ready to brew my first batch its gonna be a milk stout. I plan on doing primary and a secondary. I also am gonna be bottling. I know and understand the concept of cold crashing, but it doesnt seem like a lot of people do it. So my question is should I or should I not Cold Crash??

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Old 03-30-2011, 11:05 PM   #6
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I probably wouldn't for a stout. It's too dark to really matter, plus probably no dry hop to worry about trying to get out of suspension.

Just my $0.02
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Old 03-30-2011, 11:55 PM   #7
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ok so just go from my secondary to my bottling bucket then bottle. Thanks for the advice
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Old 03-31-2011, 01:56 AM   #8
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It's called "lagering". Yep, toss that carboy into the fridge as close to 0C as you can. Let it sit undisturbed for a week or so. You can't let it sit too long.

You can learn more about it by listening to this podcast with Jamil Z and John Palmer. Lagering
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Old 03-31-2011, 02:02 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jetmac View Post
It's called "lagering". Yep, toss that carboy into the fridge as close to 0C as you can. Let it sit undisturbed for a week or so. You can't let it sit too long.
And the priming sugar will work the same even when chilled? I too am brewing my first batch. Brown ale from a kit. Fermentation has stopped, i have had it in a secondary for about a week now and it is still cloudy.
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Old 03-31-2011, 02:07 AM   #10
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lagering is for, well, lagers. cold crashing usually only takes two days or so just to clarify the beer. lagering is usually longer, and is meant to be a cold conditioning (getting rid of off flavors and what nots). kind of the same thing, but your doing it for different reasons, and usually for different lengths of time.


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