Coldbreak Brewing HERMS Giveaway!

HomeBrewSupply AMCYL Brew Kettle Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Equipment/Sanitation > Possible Glycol Chiller?
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-05-2006, 04:05 PM   #11
disaffected
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 829
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Use propylene glycol instead of ethylene glycol. Propylene glycol is less toxic, and is even used in pharmaceuticals and as a food additive. Of course, you wouldn't want to ingest large quantities of it anyway. It would probably make your beer taste terrible.

If the part of the system that is immersed in the wort is sealed, as in a copper tube, only severe damage to the copper pipe (a hole or a crack) would be a cause for concern. A length of copper tubing without fittings isn't going to leak PG or EG.


disaffected is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2006, 04:27 PM   #12
Brewpastor
Beer, not rocket science
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewpastor's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Corrales, New Mexico
Posts: 4,580
Liked 32 Times on 28 Posts

Default

"Food Grade" gylcol is the way to go. A simple chiller can be made utilizing an existing freezer, a plastic bucket, a submersable pump, a Ranco Temperature Controller, a chilling coil and some tubing. Fill your bucket with your glycol, attach the pump to to the tubing that loops through chilling coil in your towers or fermenter and back into the glycol bucket, plug the pump into your temperature controller with the controller's probe being placed in a cold-well in the fermenter or tower, place the bucket in the bottom of your freezer, set the controller to the temperature you desire and enjoy.


__________________
Before I learned to brew I was poor, sober and lonely. Now I am just poor.
Brewpastor is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2006, 06:33 PM   #13
disaffected
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 829
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts

Default

You can get food grade propylene glycol at The Chemistry Store for $17.88 per gallon. I just ordered another gallon for my humidor, and I mix it 50:50 with distilled water. A gallon lasts me a really long time for my humidor, and it is far more economical to buy it this way than to buy a 50:50 solution for $10 a pint from my tobacconist. Shipping from SC to TX was $10.61 UPS ground. They charge a $3 handling fee, so my total cost was about $31 for a gallon.

The price is $16.05 a gallon if you buy five gallons. That's probably a more reasonable quantity for a refrigeration system. Or, you can get 55 gallons for a mere $759 ($13.80 a gallon).

If you're going to use it in a refrigeration system, be aware that the food grade product doesn't have any additives to prevent corrosion build up in your plumbing system. Pay a few pennies more and get the version that has corrosion inhibitors added to it. Remember, the glycol runs through a closed system. It isn't going to get in your beer.
disaffected is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 02:45 AM   #14
Bsquared
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Bsquared's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1,830
Liked 58 Times on 53 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

Okay I'm a little confused on why you would want to use even food grade Glycol? Maybe I'm missing the point, but If the goal is to keep your fermentation at a desired temperature between 45-65F why not just use deionized water. Pure water has a larger heat capacitance than a Glycol:water mix, so you would be moving more heat/liter if you just used water
Bsquared is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 05:26 AM   #15
mpcluever
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: here
Posts: 617
Liked 37 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 55

Default

Resurrecting the dead here, but came across this on Google. You use glycol because the cooling coils will freeze up using water even though the rest of the solution is above freezing. I have an air conditioner in the glycol bath and even that gels up a bit. When we tested it with water, it froze up somewhere when the bath approached freezing, but not quite. I should also point out that we're chilling multiple fermenters so we want it fairly cold and we're running coils outside the fermenter so toxicity really wasn't an issue for us. For a single fermenter, you could certainly run plain water above freezing the coils up.


mpcluever is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Home Made Glycol Chiller from A/C unit terrazza Equipment/Sanitation 24 07-28-2011 03:35 AM
Glycol Chiller DIY Ideas trailblazer Fermentation & Yeast 4 10-05-2009 04:48 PM
The glycol froze bashe Equipment/Sanitation 7 06-09-2009 02:46 AM
To glycol or not Brewme Bottling/Kegging 15 12-30-2008 04:12 PM
Propylene Glycol? sonvolt Recipes/Ingredients 4 12-13-2006 07:45 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS