Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Infection or Gravity Problem; over-carbonation
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-06-2010, 10:24 PM   #11
smizak
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 1,811
Liked 102 Times on 75 Posts
Likes Given: 73

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanzimonson View Post
Man I hate bottle conditioning exactly for reasons like this. Definitely my first recommendation is what people have been mentioning about actually measuring the volume of beer being bottled. That's NOT the recipe size, it's NOT the amount of beer in the primary, it's NOT the amount in the secondary, it's how much is in the bottling bucket. From brewing to bottling I've sometimes lost 3 quarts of beer if I use a low-flocculation yeast and use a secondary for adding flavors/dry hops. You have to adjust for the fact you're bottling less beer.

Furthermore, you also need to account for how much carbonation is currently dissolved in the beer. Just because your carboy is unpressurized doesn't mean there's no CO2 in the beer. Any liquid can hold a certain quantity of CO2, depending on its temperature, but I find this an incredibly frustrating thing to estimate.

For example, let's say you have a beer that ferments at 65*. Then it finishes, but you have a heat spell come through and the beer makes it up to 70*. Because of the higher temps, wouldn't you have less CO2 in solution? How much less? Also, I find that the vigorous activity of racking to a secondary will cause some CO2 to escape the solution, but I don't know how much.

I tried to be so meticulous with temperatures and weighing my ingredients, and I still had problems with low and high carbonation. I finally got the kegging equipment and never looked back.
If you can control those factors though, it can be done properly. I carb all of my beers to style. I've accurately measured and marked my carboys and bottling buckets, I know exactly how much beer will end up in my bottles. I've actually got it down to the bottle now. I'll sanitize 52 and fill 52.

I temperature control my fermenters, so I know exactly what temp my beer is going into the bucket.

I've not had any problems with carbonation. If I want it fizzy, it will be fizzy. If I want a smoother, less effervescent carbonation, no problem. Knowing your temps and volumes of your equipment is a key part of homebrewing.


__________________
"This song goes out to me because I'm so f*ckin' cool!"~John Reis
smizak is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2010, 04:55 PM   #12
secinarot
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 171
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

A question regarding the CO2 dissolved in the beer at bottling time. If you cold crash before bottling, will more CO2 be left in the beer? Should you let the beer warm to room temp after crashing and before bottling?


__________________
Primary: In Planning!
Secondary: None
secinarot is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2010, 05:09 PM   #13
craven_morhead
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Denver
Posts: 263
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I've had foaming issues where I've been sloppy with my siphoning and getting pellet hop particles in my bottles. Is that an issue for you?
__________________
Primary: Cascade/Amarillo IPA
craven_morhead is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2010, 05:31 PM   #14
smizak
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 1,811
Liked 102 Times on 75 Posts
Likes Given: 73

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by secinarot View Post
A question regarding the CO2 dissolved in the beer at bottling time. If you cold crash before bottling, will more CO2 be left in the beer? Should you let the beer warm to room temp after crashing and before bottling?
I don't. If my beer finished fermenting @ 70F and it was at that temp for a couple days, that's what temp I use in my bottling sugar calculation. If the yeast are done, no more CO2 is being produced, so the dissolved CO2 content will be approximately the same.

There was a HUGE thread about this that was very contentious. However, I can promise you that if I used the amount of sugar calculated for 35F crash cooled temperature, and not the temperature that your beer finished fermenting at, it will be under-carbed. It's the difference between 2.5 oz of sugar and 4 oz.
__________________
"This song goes out to me because I'm so f*ckin' cool!"~John Reis
smizak is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Massive infection problem Prionburger Equipment/Sanitation 37 12-27-2009 03:19 AM
Determining if I have an infection problem BeerPressure General Techniques 1 09-16-2009 11:22 PM
Carbonation/infection/preservative delema MeadnAle Equipment/Sanitation 2 08-26-2009 10:39 PM
Houston we have a problem. INFECTION?! Khaan4645 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 18 04-17-2009 04:56 PM
Infection problem brew hoperator Equipment/Sanitation 7 11-12-2008 06:09 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS