How do I get roasty flavor without color? - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > How do I get roasty flavor without color?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-05-2010, 09:38 PM   #1
kanzimonson
Recipes 
 
Aug 2009
Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 2,174
Liked 44 Times on 40 Posts



I've been thinking a lot about amber and red ales recently and how I'd like to make a beer with some strong pronounced roasty flavors but still maintain a red color.

You'll see in my Recipe tab that I have an Irish Red. I really love this beer, but its roasty character is "medium." It's a mostly caramelly beer with a crisp, dry finish. Nothing chocolatey or burnt, just toasty and mellow. Like the crust on a loaf of bread straight out of the oven, or the bottom side of a biscuit.

The beer, however, is so red that it's allllllmost brown. I really wouldn't want to increase its color the slightest bit. So my question is, if I wanted to make an amber ale that has both caramel flavors, and a strongly toasted finish, what do I do? Should I use a lot of the "toasty" malts like munich, aromatic, victory, special roast? Or should I reduce the crystal amounts and use more dark grains? I don't want to completely lose the crystal flavors, either.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2010, 09:43 PM   #2
malkore
 
malkore's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2007
Nebraska
Posts: 6,922
Liked 37 Times on 35 Posts


what are you using for base malt?

the difference between say, briess 2-row and marris otter can change the whole brew.
__________________
Malkore
Primary: English Mild
On tap: Pale Ale, Lancelot's Wheat, English Brown Ale, Steam Beer, HoovNuts IPA
Bottled: MOAM, Braggot, Raspberry Melomel, Merlot, Apfelwein, Pyment, Sweet mead, Cabernet
Gal in 2009: 27, Gal in 2010: 34, Gal in 2011: 13, Gal in 2012: 10

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2010, 09:46 PM   #3
david_42
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2005
Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,597
Liked 155 Times on 145 Posts


Roasty and toasty aren't the same flavor. If you want toasty, victory/biscuit is your best choice. Roasty flavor come from the darkest malts, not much you can do to get them without the color.
__________________
Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2010, 09:57 PM   #4
kanzimonson
Recipes 
 
Aug 2009
Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 2,174
Liked 44 Times on 40 Posts


malkore, I actually did use MO.

david, I ultimately agree, but I think there's a spectrum shift from toasty to roasty and I essentially want to up the degree to a higher level. The small quantities of dark grains in an amber or red ale fall into the spectrum, and because they're so light I don't think it's unreasonable to say they're both toasty and roasty. But your saying this definitely has me leaning towards the victory/biscuit/aromatic.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2010, 10:00 PM   #5
kanzimonson
Recipes 
 
Aug 2009
Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 2,174
Liked 44 Times on 40 Posts


And the more I think about it, I wonder if using a different yeast would be better. I used 1968 London ESB because I love the way it super emphasizes the malt. I assumed this would increase the toast and roast, but I also wonder if the higher FG due to high flocculation leaves just enough sweetness that the harsher grain flavors become more subdued?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2010, 12:57 AM   #6
TBrosBrewing
Recipes 
 
Jul 2008
New Orleans, LA
Posts: 80

http://www.stonebrew.com/news/100401b/

Here is the press release for Stone and Brew Dog's attempt at something similar. Their answer was cask and coffee aging.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2010, 03:04 AM   #7
remilard
Recipes 
 
Nov 2008
Kansas City
Posts: 3,654
Liked 43 Times on 41 Posts


You could try steeping roasted grains only and running the resulting liquor through a charcoal filter. It will remove color and it will remove flavor, not sure which it will remove more of.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2010, 03:06 AM   #8
Malticulous
 
Malticulous's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2008
St. George Utah
Posts: 4,146
Liked 72 Times on 57 Posts


IMO pale chocolate gives the most with the least color.
__________________
Everything is better with a beer.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2010, 03:59 AM   #9
Howie
Recipes 
 
Feb 2010
Raleigh
Posts: 113
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Conroe View Post
IMO pale chocolate gives the most with the least color.
I was going to suggest something like this. The lighter the roast level, the more of it you could use. The pale chocolate is around 200L. Briess also makes a roasted barley that's 300L

 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2010, 12:01 PM   #10
kanzimonson
Recipes 
 
Aug 2009
Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 2,174
Liked 44 Times on 40 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by TBrosBrewing View Post
http://www.stonebrew.com/news/100401b/

Here is the press release for Stone and Brew Dog's attempt at something similar. Their answer was cask and coffee aging.
That was an April Fool's joke.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
color and no flavor? dcp27 General Techniques 8 02-08-2010 11:19 PM
Red Color without flavor for Irish Red Ale jamesnsw Recipes/Ingredients 10 02-04-2010 04:44 AM
Roasty aftertaste in Red Ale DSV All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 18 10-16-2009 03:24 PM
Extracts provide color, flavor, or both? GNBrews Extract Brewing 6 01-09-2009 11:15 PM
YEAST = flavor, but color? alz28 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 12-20-2008 07:15 PM


Forum Jump