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Old 04-03-2010, 03:15 AM   #1
snailsongs
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Default How long does it take Co2 to equalize after a temp change?

I have been cold crashing an IPA for the last 2 days (48hrs), and I'm planning to bottle it tomorrow (w/ a yeast repitch)....my question is: how much residual carbonation should I account for at 50F degrees cold crash if it was fermented at 64f.....AKA, what should I plug into beersmith to calculate the priming sugar amount?


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Old 04-03-2010, 12:26 PM   #2
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I use beersmith and on the recipe part it asks what temp the beer is and then it changes how much corn sugar should be added.


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Old 04-03-2010, 01:09 PM   #3
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You just use the fermentation temperature, even for lagers. The reason is that co2 is "held" better in a cold liquid. But cold crashing after fermentation doesn't make more co2. If the beer was fermented at 50, then it would have more residual co2 than if it was fermented at 70, but once it's done fermenting it's not producing more co2 anyway.

So, if the beer was fermented at 64, use 64 as the temperature of the beer. The highest temperature that the beer was at is the correct number to use for the calculation.
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Old 04-08-2010, 06:28 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew View Post
You just use the fermentation temperature, even for lagers. The reason is that co2 is "held" better in a cold liquid. But cold crashing after fermentation doesn't make more co2. If the beer was fermented at 50, then it would have more residual co2 than if it was fermented at 70, but once it's done fermenting it's not producing more co2 anyway.

So, if the beer was fermented at 64, use 64 as the temperature of the beer. The highest temperature that the beer was at is the correct number to use for the calculation.
Thanks for your answer, Yooper! It took me 5 days to get back and see it, but it was exactly the answer I needed, and it makes sense.....
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Old 04-08-2010, 06:49 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snailsongs View Post
how much residual carbonation should I account for at 50F degrees cold crash
Not to be a weenie, but that's not a cold crash. If your looking to clear an ale quickly you need to get in the 30's.


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