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Old 04-02-2010, 07:11 PM   #11
Yuri_Rage
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I've taken a 2L bottle to 60 psi with no issues at all. I'm hesitant to go any higher while standing in the same room.


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Old 04-03-2010, 12:36 AM   #12
ob111
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at the 17 hour mark my bottle was at 72.5 psi more than enough for me
but I was not worried about it exploding. I watched the youtube video with the dry ice bombs and if you watch the ripples at the bottom balloon out before it explodes so at 72.5 the bottle still had its shape. it did however have an eerie sound when you tapped on the bottle kind of a low ringing sound.
so will it produce enough pressure to explode the bottle? I think I'll find out
but not at this time this one was done in my kitchen
I will load one and pot it on my sisters property (67 acres) I will put a long pilot line on it and hook a gauge to it (the kind that will hold it's highest pressure reading with out automatically resetting to zero in case the bottle is gone when I go out there) after a week in the sun if it's still intact I'll bring a rifle to defuse the situation (I'm certainly not going to walk up and open it)


on another note I noticed that the yeast flavor still gets in to the soda
has anyone ever used other sources for co2 like vinegar and baking soda
if so does it affect the taste?



 
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Old 04-03-2010, 01:36 AM   #13
Yuri_Rage
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While the idea is admirable, it's likely not cost efficient at all.

To make 1/2 lb of CO2, you'll need approximately 1 lb each of baking soda and vinegar, at a cost of about $3 ($6 per pound of CO2).

To make 1/2 lb of CO2 from table sugar and bread yeast, it will take about 1 lb of sugar and a packet of yeast, at a cost of $1 to $2 ($2 to $4 per pound of CO2).

It only costs about $10 to fill a 5 lb cylinder.

Breweries that reclaim CO2 use very expensive equipment in order to isolate CO2 gas from other fermentation by-products. You could experiment with a filtering scheme to "scrub" the gas you're getting, but that will add some cost and complexity.

Whether you're using a "generator" or a cylinder, you'll need a regulator.

It's pretty easy to justify the cost of a cylinder after examining the facts. Of course, if this is just an academic curiosity, it's certainly interesting.
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:13 AM   #14
ob111
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right now it more or less fun for me I'm making the odd bottle of root beer with extract and ginger ale from the roots but I did carb up some kool aid to day it was different
if I start getting serious about it I'll look in to a tank
do you know if the baking soda and vinegar would affect the taste

 
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:16 AM   #15
Yuri_Rage
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My guess is that the vinegar/baking soda method will be a little cleaner, but you might still get an off flavor. I've never heard of anyone trying it.
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Old 04-03-2010, 02:34 AM   #16
ob111
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I was worried about the vinegar affecting the taste but it just dawned on me I could use lemon juice that shouldn't hurt the taste I put lemon juice in my ginger ale
now I guess a little testing needs to be done like how much of each so I don't blow up the bottle it seem to create co2 a little faster than yeast


see this is fun
I getting closer and closer to just putting dry ice in to my pop cools as it carbonates

 
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Old 04-20-2010, 06:18 PM   #17
kenc_zymurgy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri_Rage View Post
While the idea is admirable, it's likely not cost efficient at all.

...

To make 1/2 lb of CO2 from table sugar and bread yeast, it will take about 1 lb of sugar and a packet of yeast, at a cost of $1 to $2 ($2 to $4 per pound of CO2).

It only costs about $10 to fill a 5 lb cylinder.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ob111 View Post
see this is fun
Please keep us informed. This is very interesting. Realizing that 3/4 cup of sugar is enough to carbonate 5 G of beer, why not produce small amounts this way?

I agree with Yuri_Rage that this isn't practical for full-time keggers, but for people who just want a source of CO2 for occasional use (carb up a 2L bottle with a carb-cap), it might make perfect sense.

I just spent $36 for a 20 oz paintball tank and a remote so I could hook it up to my regulator (another ~ $35?). Then I'll spend ~ $4 for a fill. You would probably still want a secondary regulator (but you could get away w/o one, by opening a valve, monitoring pressure, then closing), but at least there is no super-high pressure or special fittings required. Regular hardware store stuff should do. Be good to have a ~60PSI safety valve to blow off excess pressure. And you might want a carbon filter inline?

Tire-stem carb caps are easy and cheap and you can clamp a hose over them (remove the valve for this application). I could see connecting up a few 2L bottles as the sources, put a cheap pinch clamp on each, and you could disconnect them one at a time to dump the contents (leaving some yeast behind) and just add more sugar & water. Wait till it displaces the O2, then reattach and open the clamp when pressure builds.

I guess my big question is, does that 3/4C of sugar in one 2L bottle really produce that big of a store of CO2? When I prime/carb my beer, the liquid is absorbing the CO2. I'm not sure that airspace in the bottles would hold so much.

Oh, and here is an interesting link:

http://www.angelfire.com/cantina/carbonation/

-kenc


 
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Old 04-22-2010, 11:43 PM   #18
ob111
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well I've got an update I'm off the bottle (so to speak)
I went on beverage factory web site and bought a 5lb aluminum tank and a reg
with primary and secondary gauges
and life is great
I just need to find a great ginger ale recipe now
I tried using powdered citric acid instead of lemon juice and have learned
that 1 tsp is wayyyyyyyyy to much for 2L of pop (my tongue hates me right now)

 
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Old 04-23-2010, 02:49 PM   #19
marcelo
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Dry ice is nitrogen rigth? so, use it to presurize the beer or soda, didn't it look like guinness beer?
it will be cool

 
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Old 04-24-2010, 04:04 AM   #20
ob111
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No dry ice is not nitrogen
Dry ice, sometimes referred to as "Cardice" or as "card ice" is the solid form of carbon dioxide.
dry ice sublimates at -78.5 C and is used mainly as a refrigerant
I was only joking about using it, way to many youtube videos of people getting hurt containing that stuff
The expansion ratio of dry ice is 1 to 554 so you would really have to do the math before trying that out ( I would recommend not trying it)



 
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